Bon Appetit (1847, 1853,1856)

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Tue Feb 4 07:34:06 UTC 2003


   OED has 1860 for "bon appetit."  Merriam-Webster just says it's French.
   These are from Accesible Archives.



ITEM #558
August, 1847
Godey's Lady's Book
Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Vol XXXV page 77
UNCLE PHILIP.
BY MISS LESLIE.
(...)
Madame then continued her story and her pineapple. "Ah! mon bien-aime Alphonse,"(12*) said she, "he had fourteen wounds I will take another slice, if you please, Madame Colavering. There there, a little more sugar. Bien oblige (13*) a little more still. Maman, vans ne mangez pas de << bon appetit>> . Ah! je comprens vous voulez de la creme avec votre anana. (14*) Madame Colavering, will you do mamma the favor to have some cream brought for her? and I shall not refuse some for myself. Ah! mon Alphonsethe object of my first grand passion! He exhibited in dying some contortions that were hideous absolument effroyable (15*) they are always present before my eyes Madame Colavering, I would prefer those two under slices; they are the best penetrated with the sugar, and also well steeped in the jus." (16*)
(...)


ITEM #3939
November, 1853
Godey's Lady's Book
Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Vol XLVII Page 462

CROCHET. NAPKIN RINGS.

Materiais. One skein of purse silk and three strings of beads will be required for each ring; they must he varied, or, if preferred of one color, numbered on the plain space.
(...)
Work two rounds plain, one round passing down a bead at each stitch, one round plain. Work one round at each edge with the gold color or whatever is preferred for the edge.

The motto on this ring is << Bon Appetit>>  (Good Appetite).



ITEM #65756
January 17, 1856
THE NATIONAL ERA
Washington, D.C., Vol. X No. 472 P. 9
For the National Era.
(...)
If we agree with the principles of the Republican Party, we do not conceal to ourselves its defects; but we know that it is only commending its existence, and we think it is the duty of every liberal man to obtain at least for it a ground, on which it can show whether or not it is in earnest in carrying out its principles. As long as men like Mr. Seward are at its head, we have reason to believe in its sincerity. But we leave to democratical newspaper-writers β€œto go through thick and thin for The Party.” Great is Democracy, and still greater its stomach. Loaves, fishes, and national shoe-nails, are its daily food; and just now the chivalrous South treats it with a dish full of juicy cowhides, and inviting bowie-knives. A little shudder, and it will swallow them too. β€œ<< Bon appetit>> !”-
(...)



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