[Ads-l] "Pleasant gentleman"

Joel S. Berson Berson at ATT.NET
Fri Nov 7 03:21:01 UTC 2014


At 11/6/2014 07:13 PM, Baker, John wrote:
>My impression is that "pleasant," and like 
>words, are supposed to say something about the 
>patient's demeanor.  Its absence, in other 
>words, might in some circumstances be significant.

I suspect that such is the case, whether its 
absence or the presence of other adjectives.  For 
example, "agitated" would have significance.  As 
would, say, "commoner".  I'll have to ask my PCP for a copy of the glossary.

And, Jon, you wrote
>"Pleasant" sounds like overkill to me.  Any 
>chance that it's code for "unpleasant"?

I resent that!  An unwarranted slur!  And libel!

Joel
:-)



>John Baker
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: American Dialect Society 
>[mailto:ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] On Behalf Of Jonathan Lighter
>Sent: Thursday, November 06, 2014 7:06 PM
>To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
>Subject: Re: "Pleasant gentleman"
>
>"Pleasant" sounds like overkill to me.  Any chance that it's code for
>"unpleasant"BƒB’“BƒB“ÛˆK›Ýˆ
>‹ŒM]
>>ÈK]™H]\Àe <dwhause at cablemo.net> wrote:
>
> > ---------------------- Information from the mail header
> > -----------------------
> > Sender:       American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
> > Poster:       Dave Hause <dwhause at CABLEMO.NET>
> > Subject:      Re: "Pleasant gentleman"
> >
> > 
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>B‚’6âwB&V6ÆÂ7V6­f­2æöâÖ0omplimentary descriptive terms but most
>˜XÝ][ۙ\œÈrecognize that the described patient may read their
>@scription and so would be reluctant to put negative comments in writing.
>]™CBˆKKKKHܚYÚ[˜[Y\ÜØYÙHKKKKCB€> From: "Joel S. Berson" <Berson at ATT.NET>
> > To: <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
> > Sent: Thursday, November 06, 2014 12:23 PM
> > Subject: Re: "Pleasant gentleman"
>B‚FfRÂF€anks for telling me it's not uncommon (although one always
> > wants to be unique).
> >
> > Have you seen any characterizations that are less complimentary than
> > "pleasant gentleman"?  I am imagining a "patient demeanor" graphical
> > chart, like those for degree of pain, ranging from a broad smile and
> > top-hat for 10 -- "very pleasant gentleman" -- down to a hostile
>œ›Ýۈ[™\™Û\‰ÜÈX\ÚȀor 1 -- ƒBƒBˆ›Ù[B€Ð Ð€ÄļԼÈЀÄÄèA4°
ٔ ause wrote:
> > >I'm not sure I'd call it a technical term, but I've seen it fairly
> > œ™\]Y[H[ˆ™\ܝȜ›ÛHconsultants, as in "Thank you for referring
> > this
>œleasant gentleman to me..."  Hospital admissions, ER notes, clinic notes,
> > ]ËݚZÙHYH\È]XÚ\ÜÈZÙ[Ho use this phrase.
>‘]™H]\ÙKÚ]\ÙPØX›[[˛™]B€ >Waynesville, MO
> > >----- Original Message -----
> > >From: "Joel S. Berson" <Berson at ATT.NET>
> > ΈQËSTÕSERV.UGA.EDU>
> > B‚ä­â&W÷'G2f­Æ&ƒFòÖR&÷WBÐy visits to medical practitioners I
> > >have so often been described under the heading "Physical Examination
>‹À General" as "a pleasant gentleman" that I am wondering whether it
>š\ÈHXښXØ[\›HوH›Ù™\ÜÚ[ۋƒBˆ
>ŠIÛH›ÝÛÛ\Z[š[™ÈKH]      Üș]\ˆ[ˆ™Z[™ÈØ[@d "difficult",
> > >"obstreperous", or something worse than a gentleman.)
>ƒBˆ‹KKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK at ----------------------------
> > H[Y\šXØ[ˆX[XÝÛØÀiety - http://www.americandialect.org
> >
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> > The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
> >
>
>
>
>--
>"If the truth is half as bad as I think it is, you can't handle the truth."
>
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