[Ads-l] blood in one's eye; hormonal; to "late-night angry-tweet"

Jonathan Lighter wuxxmupp2000 at GMAIL.COM
Sun Aug 9 14:27:11 UTC 2015


Shd be "fulminate against," but hey, we can always use new transitives.

JL

On Sun, Aug 9, 2015 at 10:24 AM, Jonathan Lighter <wuxxmupp2000 at gmail.com>
wrote:

> ---------------------- Information from the mail header
> -----------------------
> Sender:       American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
> Poster:       Jonathan Lighter <wuxxmupp2000 at GMAIL.COM>
> Subject:      blood in one's eye; hormonal; to "late-night angry-tweet"
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> I can't find this familiar idiom in OED, but 30 seconds of research finds
> an 1800 ex. in GB.
>
> It mean's, of course, "intent on killing; (hence) intent on victory,
> revenge, etc."
>
> For those who've been visiting the off-world colonies, Donald Trump told
> CNN Friday that, when questioning him in the debate, Megyn Kelly "had blood
> coming out of her eyes, coming out of her...wherever."
>
> What Trump may have meant by "wherever" is now the hottest political topic
> in America. It's completely overshadowing the issue of whether it's
> presidential to fulminate a leading journalist for asking an embarrassing
> question on TV - and calling her in tweets and retweets a "bimbo,"  the
> "biggest loser of the night," "astonishingly biased," and "funny to watch."
>
> Trump has also tweeted and repeated that only a "deviant" or a "sick
> person" would interpret what he didn't say as referring to Kelly's, er, you
> know.  He says he was thinking "ears" or "nose" but decided (wisely) to
> move on.
>
> (At least it's good to know that *I'm* not "sick" or a "deviant," since the
> gross menopausal interpretation did not occur to me.  Nor, if you can
> believe them, did it occur to my wife or to my two old grad school buddies
> who've spent their careers in the law. Are they putting me on?)
>
> But the second linguistic point is Trump's assertion that "blood coming out
> of [one's] eyes" is a "very common expression." (He repeated it today with
> "...pouring..."
>
> News to me.  Is it a rare eggcorn for "blood in  one's eye," or is it
> really a "very common" eggcorn?
>
> II
> The mediopolitical word of the weekend is "hormonal."  It has been said
> again and again that Trump meant Kelly was "hormonal" for asking him why he
> has berated certain women who disagree with him as "fat pigs," "dogs," and
> "animals." (Part 2 of the question was how Trump might defend himself
> against Clintonian charges that he is "part of the War on Women)."
>
> The new sense of "hormonal"  - 'affected by menopause; (hence) in a foul or
> aggressive mood' - isn't in OED *or* HDAS.
>
> III
>
> Washington Post
>
> http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2015/08/07/donald-trump-late-night-angry-tweets-megyn-kelly-and-it-is-epic/
>
> "Donald Trump late-night angry-tweets Megyn Kelly, and it is epic."
>
> JL
> --
> "If the truth is half as bad as I think it is, you can't handle the truth."
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>



-- 
"If the truth is half as bad as I think it is, you can't handle the truth."

------------------------------------------------------------
The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org


More information about the Ads-l mailing list