[Ads-l] on the eggcorn watch--"post phone"

Laurence Horn laurence.horn at YALE.EDU
Sat Aug 15 18:18:20 UTC 2015


Just came across this in a header within a description of a survivorship life insurance plan:

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http://www.groco.com/readingroom/estate_survivorship.aspx

Post Phone a Buy Sell

If Joe and Bill were equal partners in a business, good planning would have them meet with their attorney and accountant, put a value on the business that each are happy with and have a buy-sell agreement drawn. Fund the agreement with life insurance and the funds are assured for the buy-out.

However, what if Joe’s wife, Ann, is also active in the business? If Joe dies, Ann would inherit Joe’s interest and continue to work in the business as usual. In this case, it would make sense to use a survivorship life insurance policy to insure both Joe and Ann. The buy-sell agreement would be worded to trigger the buy-out at the second of their deaths.
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and here, from a usage list, is a serious question about whether it's really "postpone" or "post phone":

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http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/126477/postpone-or-postphone

I was taught that the word postpone was spelled as I just spelled it, but recently I have seen a rise in the spelling postphone (or post phone). At first, I thought it was just a spelling error, but I have begun to see it more and more in official contexts.
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Other examples are not that hard to find, e.g. "The majority voted to post phone the meeting."  

Some hits for "postphone" (spelled as one word) seem to be intentional puns, but most seem to be just instances of the trend noted above.

Whodathunk it?  [not listed in ecdb]

LH
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