[Ads-l] grieve, trans.

Jonathan Lighter wuxxmupp2000 at GMAIL.COM
Fri Jan 23 17:16:46 UTC 2015


Thanks, John.The text this time is clear.

JL

On Fri, Jan 23, 2015 at 10:44 AM, Baker, John <JBAKER at stradley.com> wrote:

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> Sender:       American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
> Poster:       "Baker, John" <JBAKER at STRADLEY.COM>
> Subject:      Re: grieve, trans.
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Since emails I send as replies seem to result in gibberish for many, I'll
> s=
> ee if this will work if sent as a new message.  Please let me know if you
> c=
> an read this and you otherwise see emails from me as random code, since
> the=
> y come through fine for me.
>
>
> Fred Shapiro mentioned the "file a formal grievance" sense of "grieve" in
> 2=
> 011, but I don't think there was any further discussion.  Of course, the
> OE=
> D entry for grieve, v., has not been fully updated since 1900.  This sense
> =
> of "grievance" is also missing from the OED.
>
> Modern American dictionaries, such as M-W and AHD, do have definitions for
> =
> this sense of "grieve."  AHD's usage note says, "More recently, grieve has
> =
> also come to be used to mean "to file an official or formal grievance."
> Thi=
> s extended sense does not find favor with the Usage Panel. In 2013, only
> 21=
>  percent found its use in this passage acceptable:  _Saradnik was asked to
> =
> resign as coach following complaints by several parents. Because Saradnik
> h=
> as grieved his dismissal, school officials aren't commenting._  This usage
> =
> is relatively uncommon outside of the sphere of labor and management
> disput=
> es."
>
> Of course, the views of a generalist usage panel matter little when it
> come=
> s to a technical usage.  Bryan Garner writes in Garner's Dictionary of
> Lega=
> l Usage (3d ed. 2011):  "But recently the verb has taken on a new legal
> mea=
> ning:  "to bring a grievance for the purpose of protesting."  The
> emergence=
>  of this sense is not entirely surprising because it is implied by the
> word=
> s _grievable_ and _grievant_.  Stylists are not likely to use the verb,
> but=
>  neither are they likely to succeed in expunging it."  Garner goes on to
> qu=
> ote some examples from published legal opinions.
>
> The earliest example I see is from 1951, referring to events of 1949:
> "Fol=
> lowing these futile negotiations the parties met again on April 27 [,
> 1949,=
> ] when the Respondent produced another written proposed agreement. . . .
> [T=
> ]he Respondent's new proposals added the following new demands:  1.
> Elimina=
> ted the clause guaranteeing employees freedom from discharge except for
> 'ju=
> st cause' and the right to grieve for the abuse thereof . . . ."  NLRB v.
> H=
> art Cotton Mills, 190 F.2d 964, 967 n.2 (4th Cir. 1951).
>
>
> John Baker
>
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