[Ads-l] Mayflower passengers called puke stockings?

Joel Berson berson at ATT.NET
Wed Nov 25 15:27:25 UTC 2015


I can add only two more spoonfuls to the porridge, and they're historical rather than etymological.

(1)  The Mayflower voyage was rough, and some passengers may have vomited.  One might look at Bradford's History to see if he said anything about this.  Some editions are online.

(2)  If "puke" in "puke stockings" refers to the color and material of the stockings of the Mayflower passengers, it is perhaps more likely to be a "sad" (drab) color than a yellow and a coarse cloth rather than a fine.  The Mayflower's passengers were not wealthy, as compared to the Puritans of the Bay Colony, and also less well educate.

Joel

      From: Christopher Philippo <toff at MAC.COM>
 To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU 
 Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2015 10:06 AM
 Subject: [ADS-L] Mayflower passengers called puke stockings?
   
http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2015/11/watch-thanksgiving-myth-vs-fact/

The video claims that the Mayflower passengers were called puke stockings for puking in their stockings on the way over. What is the source for the claim that they were called puke stockings and is the explanation of why really accurate?

https://books.google.com/books?id=wKXTAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA324
http://www.word-detective.com/2009/01/puke/
http://www.shakespeareswords.com/Headwords-Instance.aspx?Ref=12641


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