[Ads-l] Teddy (undergarment), Teddy Bear (UNCLASSIFIED)

Joel Berson berson at ATT.NET
Tue Jan 26 15:26:42 UTC 2016


I don't see legs on these " 'Teddy Bear' combinations ", but rather combinations of "chemise and panties".  Perhaps "combinations" indicates that one could mix and match tops and bottoms.

In an attempt to forestall Larry, I do see the wearer's legs that go up to her ... wherever.


Joel

 

      From: Amy West <medievalist at W-STS.COM>
 To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU 
 Sent: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 7:58 AM
 Subject: Re: [ADS-L] Teddy (undergarment), Teddy Bear (UNCLASSIFIED)
   
What I'm noticing it that it's appearing as part of the phrase "teddy 
bear combination": from the description these things definitely have 
legs, I don't know if they have arms, but that has to be the point of 
visual similarity that gets it the "teddy bear" label. (And I've sent 
this on to the costume historians I know . . . mostly because I just 
don't understand corset covers . . . )

---Amy West

On 1/26/16 12:00 AM, ADS-L automatic digest system wrote:
> Date:    Mon, 25 Jan 2016 19:31:24 +0000
> From:    "Mullins, Bill CIV (US)"<william.d.mullins18.civ at MAIL.MIL>
> Subject: Teddy (undergarment), Teddy Bear (UNCLASSIFIED)
>
> CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED
>
> For Teddy (undergarment) OED has 1924, with note "perhaps transf. use of sense 1"
> (sense 1 is "Teddy bear", the stuffed animal doll).
>
> I believe the note is almost certainly true; consider:
>
> _The Whitewright [TX] Sun_  2 Feb 1912 p 4 col 2 [display ad, newspapers.com]
> "Table Display.  Dainty corset covers, "Teddy Bear" combinations, drawers,
> skirts, gowns, and chemises, in wonderful variety, 3.50 and 3.75 garments, now
> only . . . . . . .  $2.75"
>
>
> _Houston Daily Post_  26 Jul 1914 p 14 col 4 [display ad, newspapers.com]
> "Silk and Muslin Underwear
> . . . .
> Seco Silk Teddy Bear Combinations, Drawers and Bloomers, all  . . . . . . . . $1.45"
>
>
> _St. Louis Post-Dispatch_  7 Oct 1914 p 6 col 5 [display ad, newspapers.com]
> "The "Teddy Bear" Combination is one of the most popular garments in vogue and plays
> a prominent part in the wardrobe of the well-gowned woman.  It is universally liked
> because it is made in one piece and serves in place of a corset cover and drawers."
>
> _Junction City [KS] Daily Union_  23 Dec 1915 p 6 col 1 [display adv, newspapers.com]
> "Kayser Silk Underwear
> . . .  .
> Kayser Silk Teddies  . . . . $2.50 to $4.50"
>
>
> Under the entry for "Teddy Bear" is sense 4, "= TEDDY n. 3", that is, the undergarment,
> with a date of 1978.
>
> For the stuffed animal "Teddy Bear," OED has 22 Sept 1906.  Note that the etymology of
> the toy "Teddy Bear" doesn't match the general origin of the toy itself, as is found in
> Wikipedia.  But the late appearance of "Teddy Bear" (1906, rather than the date of the
> hunting trip in 1902) tends to support the OED explanation.
>
> _Washington Post_  15 Feb 1906 p 7 col 3  [display ad, newspapers.com]
> "Attention is called to a new invoice of the popular "Teddy Bear."  The demand for this
> toy at Christmas exceeded our stock on hand, and we ordered another lot, which we
> have just received."
> CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED

------------------------------------------------------------
The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org



------------------------------------------------------------
The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
  


More information about the Ads-l mailing list