[Ads-l] "Bugger"

Robin Hamilton robin.hamilton3 at VIRGINMEDIA.COM
Mon Jul 11 19:58:42 EDT 2016


The more-common Brit use of "bugger," as a generalised, if mild, exclamation 
of irritation.

>From John Crace's political sketch column in the Guardian, channelling the 
soon-to-be-no-longer PM, David Cameron:

        Back at No 10, David Cameron was on the phone to his therapist
        trying to deal with his self-destructive issues when he heard that 
Theresa
        was going to be moving in a great deal earlier than anticipated. 
“Bugger
         it,” he yelled. It just wasn’t fair.

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jul/11/boris-johnson-michael-gove-andrea-leadsom-theresa-may-manic-monday

Is it just me, or does anyone else immediately think of Voltaire's Candide 
when this topic comes up?

Robin Hamilton

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----Original Message----- 
From: Wilson Gray
Sent: Monday, July 11, 2016 9:55 PM
To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: Re: "Bugger"

On Mon, Jul 11, 2016 at 3:45 PM, Peter Reitan <pjreitan at hotmail.com> wrote:

> When we meant "booger," we pronounced it like book.


We also have both meanings, but there's absolutely no difference in
pronunciation. The sexual reading that standard _bugger_ can have is also
absolutely absent.


-- 
-Wilson
-----
All say, "How hard it is that we have to die!"---a strange complaint to
come from the mouths of people who have had to live.
-Mark Twain

------------------------------------------------------------
The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org 

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The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org


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