[Ads-l] pozzy (jam) in South Africa in 1900?

ADSGarson O'Toole adsgarsonotoole at GMAIL.COM
Mon Oct 3 10:39:54 EDT 2016


I can confirm that the British Newspaper Archive at
britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk does have the 1900 newspaper containing
"pozzy".

Date: August 18, 1900
Newspaper: The Worcestershire Chronicle
Newspaper Location: Worcestershire, England
Article: "WHAT'S POZZY?"
Quote Page 2, Column 7
Database: www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk

[Begin excerpt; double-check for errors]
'Do you get enough grub?' he inquired, pointing to a friend of mine.
'I could do a few more biscuits,' was the answer. 'I'm afraid we can't
manage that. You get a pound, and our transport can't carry more,'
Methuen replied. 'A little more 'pozzy' would be all right, too, Sir,'
said my friend. 'What's pozzy?' Methuen asked, smilingly. 'Jam, Sir,'
chorussed the men.
[End excerpt]

Garson

On Mon, Oct 3, 2016 at 9:48 AM, Stephen Goranson <goranson at duke.edu> wrote:
> A  site, "Great War Forum," gives a scan of a newspaper article "What's Pozzy?"--jam--said to be from 18 August 1900 Worcestershire Chronicle. I can't definitely confirm the date, but the content seems plausible: [Second Boer?] war in South Africa and [Field Marshall Paul ?] Methuen.
>
> http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?/
>
>
> Another site, "British Library, World War One, SlangTerms at the Front," offers:
>
> "The limited diet of the British soldier in the front line included Tickler's Plum and Apple Jam, known as 'pozzy' (possibly from a South African word for 'preserved food'),...."
>
> https://www.bl.uk/world-war-one/articles/slang-terms-at-the-front#sthash.4WDu5jVN.dpuf
>
>
>
> Stephen Goranson
>
> http://people.duke.edu/~goranson/
>
>
>
>
>
>
> from a Sept. 29, 2016 post:
>
> OED's word of the day yesterday had pozzy ("origin unknown") from Jan. 1915.
>
>
> Here in a google books snippet scan that includes the date Nov. 13, 1914 and p. no. 72, The Oxford Magazine (said to be vol. 33):
>
>
> ... those near him about some jam (' pozzy ') that had been served to them. He fell senseless, but recovered consciousness, smiled, and said, ' [snippet scan starts here] It 's all right, boys ; pass the word along to Mr. S that I shan't want any "pozzy" to-night' That was all. "Mr. S____ , the nearest officer, on getting the message, burst into tears, and all the men were quite downhearted.
>
>
> https://books.google.com/books?id=0jLmAAAAMAAJ&q=pass+the+pozzy&dq=pass+the+pozzy&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwilk4LWwLTPAhWDNSYKHdTrAlEQ6AEIJDAB
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org

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The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org


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