[Ads-l] sled-riding [was: assorted]

paul johnson paulzjoh at MTNHOME.COM
Tue Feb 28 17:16:12 EST 2017


pretty sure that was called 'bellyflopping', back in the '40's in Chicago


On 2/28/2017 1:57 PM, Joel Berson wrote:
> One of the ways I used to sled.  Depends on the hardness of the snow whether one throws oneself down with the sled while moving forward (bent at the waist), or places oneself and the sled on the ground and pushes with the feet.  Also depends on the courage and the bone density of the sledder.
>
> Joel
>
>        From: Amy West <medievalist at W-STS.COM>
>   To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
>   Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2017 7:49 AM
>   Subject: Re: [ADS-L] assorted
>     
> On 2/28/17 12:00 AM, ADS-L automatic digest system wrote:
>> Date:    Mon, 27 Feb 2017 16:17:54 +0000
>> From:    Joel Berson<berson at ATT.NET>
>> Subject: Re: assorted
>>
>> Didn't we "throw ourselves down*with*  a sled", rather than "on"?  That is, while holding it beneath oneself, not while it was already on the ground.  Or more formally, "throw oneself down on the ground with a sled".
>>
>> Joel
> When we briefly had snow here, I was going up a fire road on the
> backside of Wachusett Mountain (on my tele skis) and I passed 2 older
> folks coming down. One with a metal-runner Radio flyer sled. He put it
> down on the path packed down by snowshoers and hikers and then lowered
> himself onto it  with his arms while pushing with his feet. He rode it
> belly-down, head-first, and with his shins up in the air, bent up at the
> knees.
>
> ---Amy West
>
>
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> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
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>     
>
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> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
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