[Ads-l] Warning to Quotographers: Suspicious Hemingway byline in Playboy

ADSGarson O'Toole adsgarsonotoole at GMAIL.COM
Tue Mar 14 13:15:52 EDT 2017


Peter: Thanks for searching and pointing to the poem by Tennyson. It
is an interesting match. I think the verse may be referring to a
movement toward "higher things" via transcendence after death. There
is some ambiguity.

Garson


On Mon, Mar 13, 2017 at 9:18 PM, Peter Reitan <pjreitan at hotmail.com> wrote:
> A 1911 example (The Indianapolis News, December 12, 1911, page 6 (Newspapers.com)) credits the quote to an old "Hindoo proverb".  It also provides an alternate Tennyson quote that suggests a similar sentiment to the second part of the proverb:
>
>
> "I held it truth, with him who sings
>
> To one clear harp in divers tones,
>
> That men may rise on stepping-stones
>
> Of their dead selves to higher things."
>
>
> From part I of Tennyson's In Memoriam A. H. H., the same poem in which he wrote, "tis better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at all."
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU> on behalf of ADSGarson O'Toole <adsgarsonotoole at GMAIL.COM>
> Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 12:05 PM
> To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
> Subject: Warning to Quotographers: Suspicious Hemingway byline in Playboy
>
> ---------------------- Information from the mail header -----------------------
> Sender:       American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
> Poster:       ADSGarson O'Toole <adsgarsonotoole at GMAIL.COM>
> Subject:      Warning to Quotographers: Suspicious Hemingway byline in Playboy
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> I received two requests to examine the following quotation which is
> often ascribed to Ernest Hemingway:
>
> There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true
> nobility is being superior to your former self.
>
> An instance appears in the April 1897 issue of "Ethical Addresses".
> This date was two years before the birth of Hemingway. Earlier
> citations would be welcome.
>
> An instance also appears in the January 1963 issue of Playboy magazine
> within an article titled "A Man=E2=80=99s Credo" with the byline Ernest
> Hemingway. However, English Professor Peter L. Hays, a Hemingway
> specialist, believes that the byline is false.
>
> More details here:
> http://quoteinvestigator.com/2017/03/11/superior/
>
> Garson
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org

------------------------------------------------------------
The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org


More information about the Ads-l mailing list