[Ads-l] access as a count noun - 1976

Dan Goncharoff thegonch at GMAIL.COM
Tue May 9 16:29:30 EDT 2017


"Public access" is used as a noun to refer to locations where the public
can legally get to a body of water, river, etc, for over 30 years. Multiple
points are called "accesses", as seen here:

https://books.google.com/books?id=uGIRAAAAIAAJ&q=%22A+PUBLIC+ACCESS%22+river&dq=%22A+PUBLIC+ACCESS%22+river&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjy5q6m0uPTAhVh64MKHXooDXwQ6AEILzAD

DanG

On Tue, May 9, 2017 at 4:20 PM, Barretts Mail <mail.barretts at gmail.com>
wrote:

> In open defiance of Wiktionary (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/access <
> https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/access>) and the online Oxford
> Dictionaries (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/access <
> https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/access>,
> https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/access <https://en.
> oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/access>), today I saw a sign that
> said:
>
> This is not a Public access!!
>
> It is possible that it’s a noun like “breakfast” that favorably takes an
> article when there’s an adjective (I had breakfast already, I had a big
> breakfast), but I doubt it.
>
> 1. 1976 (Google-dated)
> Public Access to the Great Lakes
> Michael T. Neuman
> http://bit.ly/2q3Hp8L <http://bit.ly/2q3Hp8L>
>
> … this plan a Public Access to Water Resources Advisory Council,
> consisting of …
>
> 2. 2004 (Google-dated)
> Canoeing The Driftless: A Paddlers Guide for Southeastern Minnesota
> David J. Lind
> http://bit.ly/2qOGdsY <http://bit.ly/2qOGdsY>
>
> An optional put-in is a public access located by Black Bridge,…
>
> Benjamin Barrett
> Formerly of Seattle, WA
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>

------------------------------------------------------------
The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org


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