[Ads-l] go = urinate, transitive; shishi (1974?)

Wilson Gray hwgray at GMAIL.COM
Sun Nov 19 16:06:11 EST 2017


> pee-pee, n.2
> 1. nursery. = pee n.5

Does this mean that, rather than _pee_ being a clip of _pee-pee_, _pee-pee_
is a reduplication of _pee_?

Idly wondering.

On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 3:08 PM, Ben Zimmer <bgzimmer at gmail.com> wrote:

> I agree with Larry that "go" doesn't need to be understood as transitive in
> these cases, and that "go pee/poo" works as a serial verb. Interestingly,
> though, the OED entries for "pee-pee" and "wee-wee" suggest "go X" might
> have originated as an elliptical form of "go (do/make) X," supporting the
> reading of X as a noun rather than a verb. Either way, I'd say "go" here is
> intransitive and takes a verb complement of some sort, elliptical or no.
>
> ---
> pee-pee, n.2
>  1. nursery. = pee n.5
> 1923   J. Manchon Le Slang 220   To do peepee.
> 1941   E. P. O'Donnell Great Big Doorstep x. 143   Commado said, ‘When them
> twins get in the show like lass time, one's gotta make pee-pee, the udda
> one gotta climb on the seat [etc.].’
> 1962   B. J. Friedman Stern i. 58   Do you still make peepee in your pants?
> 1969   N. Freeling Tsing-Boum xiii. 92   Still, one was only a human being
> and one had to do pipi from time to time.
> 1998   L. Jackson Grange Hill (BBC TV Script, 1st draft)    You went off
> for a pee-pee and that's the last anybody saw of you.
> ---
> wee-wee, n.
>  1. Urine; an act of urination; to do (have, etc.) a wee-wee, to go (make)
> wee-wee, to urinate. Cf. water n. 17b.
> 1937   E. Partridge Dict. Slang 943/1   Wee-wee, a urination; esp. do a
> wee-wee..late C. 19–20.
> 1938   Life & Health Sept. 19/2   If he wants to urinate, it's, ‘Mommie,
> wee, wee, duty.’
> 1948   A. N. Keith Three came Home x. 184   Our barrack..smelled of kids,
> pots, and wee-wee.
> 1955   J. P. Donleavy Ginger Man xvi. 175   If you'll excuse me a moment, I
> must make wee wee.
> 1961   J. Stroud Touch & Go xiii. 138   He made his voice deliberately
> offensive: ‘He's gone to do a wee-wee.’
> 1969   M. Braithwaite Never sleep Three in Bed xvii. 76   Hub and I had to
> go wee wee, and when advised by Mother that we were to go upstairs instead
> of in the back yard we took the stairs two at a time to see if such a thing
> could be true.
> 1982   J. Scott Uprush of Mayhem vi. 67   When he needed a wee-wee he did
> it in a corner of the hut.
> ---
>
> (This reduplicated baby-talk obviously forms a strong analogical model for
> "shishi" in Hawaiian English.)
>
>
> On Sun, Nov 19, 2017 at 2:59 PM, Laurence Horn <laurence.horn at yale.edu>
> wrote:
>
> > > On Nov 19, 2017, at 2:33 PM, Barretts Mail <mail.barretts at GMAIL.COM>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > The Oxford Living Dictionaries (https://en.oxforddictionaries
> > .com/definition/go <https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/go>)
> and
> > Wiktionary (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/go <
> > https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/go>) have the meaning of
> > “urinate/defecate” as only intransitive.
> > >
> > > But “go pee/poo” must surely be transitive, with a limited range of
> > objects meaning urine or feces.
> >
> > Not sure I agree.  “Pee/poo” doesn’t really satisfy the tests for direct
> > objects:
> >
> > *Poo was gone by the baby.
> > *Pee was gone by the beer-drinkers.
> >
> > It doesn’t even seem to pattern as a noun phrase:
> >
> > *What I need to go is pee/poo.
> > *The pee that I went got on my shoes.
> >
> > “go pee” and “go poo” seem to be complex intransitive verbs or serial
> > verbs, rather than transitive verbs + objects.
> >
> > I’m not even sure I can inflect “go” in this sequence, although they’re
> > easy to find on the web:
> > ?The baby went poo.
> > ?You went pee on my shoes.
> >
> > For those who find such examples unacceptable “go pee” may be closer to
> > “go fetch”, “go take a nap”, “go fuck yourself”, or other serial verb
> > sequences which also don’t inflect, although I concede that “The baby’s
> > going poo” is a bit better (grammatically at least) than *The dog’s going
> > fetch.
> >
> >
> > LH
> >
> >
> >
> > >
> > > An alternative for pee found in Hawai'i is “shishi” borrowed from
> > Japanese (search for “shishi” on https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki
> > /%E5%B0%BF#Japanese <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E5%B0%BF#Japanese
> >).
> > >
> > > According to “Hawaiian Culture: Pidgin Phrases you Should Know” (
> > https://www.liveyouraloha.com/hawaiian-culture-pidgin-phrases-know/ <
> > https://www.liveyouraloha.com/hawaiian-culture-pidgin-phrases-know/>) by
> > Jodie Oaks, "I gotta go shishi!” is a polite way to say “that you have to
> > go pee.” The article also notes that children often use it; “shishi” is a
> > child’s word in Japanese (https://www.weblio.jp/
> content/%E3%81%97%E3%81%97
> > <https://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%97%E3%81%97> in Japanese).
> > >
> > > Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_loanwords_in_Hawaii
> <
> > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_loanwords_in_Hawaii>) also has
> > “go/make shishi”. The word “make” would seem to come from the Japanese
> suru
> > (する), since shishi(o) suru is common. “Suru” is a dummy verb with
> thousands
> > of uses; although my Mac Japanese-English dictionary does have “make” as
> > one of the meanings, it doesn’t seem to be a general way to translate
> > “suru”. As purely idle speculation, I wonder if the “make” in “make
> shishi”
> > comes by way of Portuguese or some other language.
> > >
> > > The Hawaiian Culture article and Wikipedia both talk about
> > “five-four-four" as a way to say “go shishi” in Hawaiian English. The
> > number “five” can be pronounced as “go” and “four” as “shi”. That
> Wikipedia
> > page calls it a Japanese kanji joke, but it comes from a systematic way
> of
> > pronouncing numbers to make mnemonics (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki
> > /Japanese_wordplay#Numeric_substitution <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki
> > /Japanese_wordplay#Numeric_substitution>).
> > >
> > > 1. 2005
> > > http://bit.ly/2AZUGVb <http://bit.ly/2AZUGVb>
> > > Da Kine Dictionary: Da Hawai'i Community Pidgin Dictionary Projeck
> > > by Lee A. Tonouchi
> > >
> > > cites a 1974 work by David Hiromoto, McKinley
> > >
> > > ——
> > > shishi pee or the act of peeing. I drank too much beer so now I gotta
> go
> > shishi. See also 5 4 4, sheesh.
> > > ——
> > >
> > > 2.. 2000
> > > “Encountering Sorrow” in _The Quietest Singing_
> > > By Darrell H. Y. Lum
> > > Edited by Darrell H. Y. Lum, Joseph Stanton, Estelle Enoki
> > >
> > > ——
> > > Or when Sakamoto like play wit us, his favorite team is Dicky Wee (we
> > call him Pee Wee when he _go shishi_), Calvin Hee…
> > > ——
> > >
> > > 3. 17 May 2007
> > > http://www.kiene.com/forums/showthread.php?11028-Tough%E9r-day <
> > http://www.kiene.com/forums/showthread.php?11028-Tough%E9r-day>
> > > by Otaru
> > >
> > > ——
> > > I hope you went shishi on the man-o-war sting.
> > > ——
> > >
> > > 3. 2008 (Google-dated)
> > > https://books.google.ca/books?id=OwpKAQAAIAAJ&dq=%22go+shish
> > i%22&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=shishi <https://books.google.ca/books
> > ?id=OwpKAQAAIAAJ&dq=%22go+shishi%22&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=shishi>
> > > West's Hawaii reports: cases decided in the Supreme Court, Intermediate
> > Court of Appeals, Volume 117
> > >
> > > ——
> > > … [S]o extreme mental emotional distress is not about losing control in
> > the sense that you might go shishi in your pants or that you might fall
> on
> > the floor because you can’t walk anymore.
> > > ——
> > >
> > > 4. 5 November 2009
> > > http://hemomi.blogspot.ca/2009/11/hohono.html <
> > http://hemomi.blogspot.ca/2009/11/hohono.html>
> > > by Llana
> > >
> > > ——
> > > Or you know that strong mimi (urine) smell of a small child's shorts
> > that have since dried up but you KNOW he went shishi and just won't admit
> > it?
> > > ——
> > >
> > > 5. Comment in response to a post on 8 August 2016
> > > https://www.instagram.com/p/BI4NkrCgWED/ <
> https://www.instagram.com/p/B
> > I4NkrCgWED/>
> > > comment by kimmu1988
> > >
> > > ——
> > > Went shishi part was so funny😂😂😂
> > > ——
> > >
> > >
> >
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>



-- 
-Wilson
-----
All say, "How hard it is that we have to die!"---a strange complaint to
come from the mouths of people who have had to live.
-Mark Twain

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