[Ads-l] RES: ankle-biters

Dan Goncharoff thegonch at GMAIL.COM
Sat May 12 12:38:07 EDT 2018


Not problems, but smaller competitors (in this case, hotels).

On Sat, May 12, 2018, 10:22 AM George Thompson <george.thompson at nyu.edu>
wrote:

> https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/08/business/hotel-
> development-real-estate.html?rref=collection%2Fissuecollection%2Ftodays-
> new-york-times&action=click&contentCollection=todayspaper&
> region=rank&module=package&version=highlights&contentPlacement=12&pgtype=
> collection
>
> Paragraphs 7, 8 & 9 follow (I had originally posted only para 9):
>
> However, unfamiliarity with how hotels operate can hinder chances for
> success. Stores or office tenants may lease space for several years, for
> example, which can provide developers with rental income during challenging
> economic times. But hotels rent out rooms daily, which makes them more
> susceptible to downswings. Hotel brands typically require landlords to
> spruce up the property every few years, said Andrea Olshan, chief executive
> of Olshan Properties, a developer based in New York.
>
> What’s more, enmeshing hotels in a mixed-use project only increases their
> complexity and risk. Competition from newer hotels is another threat,
> especially around successful and longstanding developments like Easton Town
> Center in Columbus, Ohio, where Olshan Properties owns three hotels. In
> fact, given the retail world’s cautious approach to expansion amid store
> bankruptcies, mall closures and the intrusion of ecommerce, Ms. Olshan
> worries less about retail development and more about new hotel
> construction.
>
> “If you have a successful mixed-use center with lots of apparel stores,
> you’ll attract tenants and it’s less likely that a shopping center will be
> built near you,” said Ms. Olshan, whose firm expects to open a hotel and
> retail development in Boston’s Haymarket district this year. “But with
> hotels, we’re seeing more and more ankle biters.”
>
> "Are the ankle-biters unforeseen problems, or ​foreseen problems, or what?"
> I stick with that speculation.
>
> GAT
>
>
> On Sat, May 12, 2018 at 7:44 AM, Jonathan Lighter <wuxxmupp2000 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Hotels, eh?
> >
> > How about "bedbugs"?
> >
> > JL
> >
> > On Thu, May 10, 2018 at 6:05 PM, Mark Mandel <mark.a.mandel at gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Thanks, that makes it quite clear.
> > >
> > > Mark Mandel
> > >
> > >
> > > On Thu, May 10, 2018, 4:35 PM Dan Goncharoff <thegonch at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> > >
> > > > Here is a link to a five year old article using "ankle-biter" in a
> > > business
> > > > context:
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > https://www.forbes.com/sites/economaney/2013/03/24/the-
> > > ankle-biter-economy-rises/
> > > >
> > > > On Thu, May 10, 2018, 4:26 PM Mark Mandel <mark.a.mandel at gmail.com>
> > > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > But that doesn't preclude an extension to a meaning like
> "small-time
> > > > > competitors" or "nuisances", as somebody suggested.
> > > > >
> > > > > Mark
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > On Thu, May 10, 2018, 10:53 AM George Thompson <
> > > george.thompson at nyu.edu>
> > > > > wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > So, "ankle-biters" are children.  I can't argue against the
> > evidence,
> > > > > > though I don't recall even being bitten on my ankle by one.
> > > > "Toe-biters" (their own toes) I could see.
> > > > > > But the statement was  “But with hotels, we’re seeing more and
> more
> > > > ankle
> > > > > > biters."   “But with hotels, we’re seeing more and more children"
> > > > Doesn't quite fit.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > GAT
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > > ------------------------------------------------------------
> > > The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > "If the truth is half as bad as I think it is, you can't handle the
> truth."
> >
> > ------------------------------------------------------------
> > The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
> >
>
>
>
> --
> George A. Thompson
> The Guy Who Still Looks Stuff Up in Books.
> Author of A Documentary History of "The African Theatre", Northwestern
> Univ. Pr., 1998.
>
> But when aroused at the Trump of Doom / Ye shall start, bold kings, from
> your lowly tomb. . .
> L. H. Sigourney, "Burial of Mazeen", Poems.  Boston, 1827, p. 112
>
> The Trump of Doom -- also known as The Dunghill Toadstool.  (Here's a
> picture of his great-grandfather.)
>
> http://www.parliament.uk/worksofart/artwork/james-gillray/an-excrescence---a-fungus-alias-a-toadstool-upon-a-dunghill/3851
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>

------------------------------------------------------------
The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org


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