[Ads-l] Antedating of "Hippie"

Andy Bach afbach at GMAIL.COM
Mon Sep 10 12:27:55 EDT 2018


Unsplit:
https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wordroutes/of-hipsters-hippies-and-hepcats/

On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 11:18 AM Ben Zimmer <bgzimmer at gmail.com> wrote:

> From Wikipedia:
>
> ----
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology_of_hippie
> The first clearly contemporary use of the word "hippie" appeared in print
> on September 5, 1965. In an article entitled "A New Haven for Beatniks,"
> San Francisco journalist Michael Fallon wrote about the Blue Unicorn
> coffeehouse, using the term hippie to refer to the new generation of
> beatniks who had moved from North Beach into the Haight-Ashbury district of
> San Francisco. (In a 1969 interview, San Francisco writer Ralph Gleason
> attributed this move to tourism.) Fallon reportedly came up with the name
> by condensing Norman Mailer's use of the word "hipster" into "hippie."
> ----
>
> Fallon's 9/5/65 article in the San Francisco Examiner was the first in a
> four-part series:
>
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611289/hippie_1/
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611379/hippie_2/
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611403/hippie_3a/
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611420/hippie_3b/
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611436/hippie_4/
>
> I used 1965 as the birth year of the Bay Area countercultural "hippie" here
> (based on Fallon's series, I think):
>
> https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wordroutes/of-hipsters-
> hippies-and-hepcats/
>
>
> On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 11:58 AM, Shapiro, Fred <fred.shapiro at yale.edu>
> wrote:
>
> > The context doesn't clarify much, but it is likely, I think, that the
> 1944
> > citation is in the basic sense of "one who is hip."
> >
> >
> > I have tried to antedate the 1966 first use for the "Berkeley
> > countercultural" sense of "hippie," but it seems to be difficult to find
> > 1965 evidence.
> >
> > Fred Shapiro
> >
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU> on behalf of
> > Laurence Horn <laurence.horn at YALE.EDU>
> > Sent: Monday, September 10, 2018 11:36 AM
> > To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
> > Subject: Re: Antedating of "Hippie"
> >
> > Presumably the surrounding context clarifies what sort of folks those
> > “hippies” were.  Note the referential split between OED hippy/hippie 1
> > (‘one who is in the know, esp. about jazz music and culture; hepcat) and
> 2
> > ('A member of a countercultural movement which began in the late 1960s,
> > characterized by pacifism, rejection of conservative values, and a
> > nonconformist appearance…’). The first attestations of the latter
> > denotation are from 1966, but I suspect it could be pushed back a little.
> >
> > LH
> >
> > > On Sep 10, 2018, at 8:58 AM, Shapiro, Fred <fred.shapiro at YALE.EDU>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > hippie (OED 1948)
> > >
> > >
> > > 1944 _New York Age_ 8 Jan. 9/8 (Readex)  There is too much adulation by
> > Harlem children of the "hippies" and their activities.
> > >
> > >
> > > Fred Shapiro
> > >
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>


-- 

a

Andy Bach,
afbach at gmail.com
608 658-1890 cell
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