[Ads-l] Antedating of "Hippie"

Wilson Gray hwgray at GMAIL.COM
Sat Sep 15 01:10:25 EDT 2018


> Some transcriptions read "Where do all the hippist (sic) meet?"

If you listen to it - YouTube is a good source - you will hear [hIpiz].
Even if you think that you hear [hIpIz] or even [hIpIs], it still is
"hippies," of which [hIpIz] and [hIpIs] are valid pronunciations in BE. To
argue for "hippist," you would have to show that the cluster, /stm/, is
maintained in the casual - or in any other style of - pronunciation of BE.

On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 12:57 PM Baker, John <JBAKER at stradley.com> wrote:

> Note that the view that Fallon’s work was the first clearly contemporary
> use is controversial on Wikipedia and primarily insisted on by one diligent
> editor.  The linked Wikipedia article cites a number of earlier examples
> that arguably represent the modern meaning:
>
>
> In a 1961 essay, Kenneth Rexroth of San Francisco used both the terms
> hipster and hippies to refer to young people participating in African
> American or Beatnik nightlife.
>
> In 1963, the Orlons, an African-American singing group from Philadelphia,
> Pennsylvania released the soul dance song "South Street", which included
> the lyrics "Where do all the hippies meet? South Street, South Street...The
> hippest street in town". Some transcriptions read "Where do all the hippist
> (sic) meet?" Nevertheless, since many heard it as "hippies", that use was
> promoted. Another 1963 song by The Dovells, "You Can't Sit Down" also
> referenced South Street Philadelphia and hippies: "When you're on South
> Street and the band is really bootin'. You hear the hippie with the back
> beat..." Another use around the same time was on the 1963 Freddy Cannon
> single on Swan Records, "Do What The Hippies Do". In addition, The Stereos,
> a doo-wop group who had already released their 1959 single "Memory Lane"
> under the alias "the Tams" (not the more famous group The Tams),
> re-released the recording yet again in 1963 under the name of "the
> Hippies".
>
> Modern use
>
> In a June 11, 1963 syndicated column by Dorothy Killgallen, she wrote "New
> York hippies have a new kick – baking marijuana in cookies". The term
> "hippie" appears in a New York Times book review of April 21, 1964 entitled
> "Is The Pentagon Threatened by Civilians on Horseback?" where it said "Mr.
> Raymond felicitously gives us a hippie link between the present and the
> past." The term appeared numerous times in the Village Voice on September
> 10, 1964 in an article entitled "Baby Beatniks Spark Bar Boom on East
> Side." Another early appearance of the term hippies was on November 27,
> 1964 in a TIME Magazine article about a 20-year old's drug use scandalizing
> the town of Darien, Connecticut: "The trouble is that in a school of 1,018
> pupils so near New York there is bound to be a fast set of hard-shell
> hippies like Alpert [the 20 year old] who seem utterly glamorous to more
> sheltered types." Shortly afterwards, on December 6, 1964, in an article
> entitled "Jean Shepherd Leads His Flock On A Search For Truth", New York
> Times journalist Bernard Weinraub wrote about the Limelight coffeehouse,
> quoting Shepherd as using the term hippie while describing the beatnik
> fashions that had newly arrived in Greenwich Village from Queens, Staten
> Island, Newark, Jersey City, and Brooklyn. And the Zanesville Times
> Recorder, on January 1, 1965, ran a story questioning how society could
> tolerate a new underground New York newspaper started by Ed Sanders called
> The Marijuana Times — whose first issue (of only two, dated January 30) it
> directly quoted as saying: "The latest Pot statistics compiled through the
> services of the Hippie Dope Exchange, will be printed in each issue of the
> Marijuana Newsletter."
>
> Another early appearance was in the liner notes to the Rolling Stones
> album, The Rolling Stones, Now!, released in February 1965 and written by
> the band's then-manager, Andrew Loog Oldham. One sentence of the notes
> reads, "Their music is Berry-chuck and all the Chicago hippies..." and
> another sentence from the same source reads, "Well, my groobies, what about
> Richmond, with its grass green and hippy scene from which the Stones
> untaned."
>
> Rev. Howard R. Moody, of the Judson Memorial Church in Greenwich Village,
> was quoted in the June 6, 1965 New York Times as saying "Every hippy is
> somebody's square. And don't you ever forget it."
>
>
>
> John Baker
>
>
>
>
> From: American Dialect Society [mailto:ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] On Behalf
> Of Ben Zimmer
> Sent: Monday 10 September 2018 12:19 PM
> To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
> Subject: Re: Antedating of "Hippie"
>
> External Email - Think Before You Click
>
> From Wikipedia:
>
> ----
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology_of_hippie
> The first clearly contemporary use of the word "hippie" appeared in print
> on September 5, 1965. In an article entitled "A New Haven for Beatniks,"
> San Francisco journalist Michael Fallon wrote about the Blue Unicorn
> coffeehouse, using the term hippie to refer to the new generation of
> beatniks who had moved from North Beach into the Haight-Ashbury district of
> San Francisco. (In a 1969 interview, San Francisco writer Ralph Gleason
> attributed this move to tourism.) Fallon reportedly came up with the name
> by condensing Norman Mailer's use of the word "hipster" into "hippie."
> ----
>
> Fallon's 9/5/65 article in the San Francisco Examiner was the first in a
> four-part series:
>
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611289/hippie_1/
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611379/hippie_2/
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611403/hippie_3a/
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611420/hippie_3b/
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/23611436/hippie_4/
>
> I used 1965 as the birth year of the Bay Area countercultural "hippie" here
> (based on Fallon's series, I think):
>
> https://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wordroutes/of-hipsters-
> hippies-and-hepcats/
>
>
> On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 11:58 AM, Shapiro, Fred <fred.shapiro at yale.edu>
> wrote:
>
> > The context doesn't clarify much, but it is likely, I think, that the
> 1944
> > citation is in the basic sense of "one who is hip."
> >
> >
> > I have tried to antedate the 1966 first use for the "Berkeley
> > countercultural" sense of "hippie," but it seems to be difficult to find
> > 1965 evidence.
> >
> > Fred Shapiro
> >
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU> on behalf of
> > Laurence Horn <laurence.horn at YALE.EDU>
> > Sent: Monday, September 10, 2018 11:36 AM
> > To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
> > Subject: Re: Antedating of "Hippie"
> >
> > Presumably the surrounding context clarifies what sort of folks those
> > “hippies” were. Note the referential split between OED hippy/hippie 1
> > (‘one who is in the know, esp. about jazz music and culture; hepcat) and
> 2
> > ('A member of a countercultural movement which began in the late 1960s,
> > characterized by pacifism, rejection of conservative values, and a
> > nonconformist appearance…’). The first attestations of the latter
> > denotation are from 1966, but I suspect it could be pushed back a little.
> >
> > LH
> >
> > > On Sep 10, 2018, at 8:58 AM, Shapiro, Fred <fred.shapiro at YALE.EDU>
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > hippie (OED 1948)
> > >
> > >
> > > 1944 _New York Age_ 8 Jan. 9/8 (Readex) There is too much adulation by
> > Harlem children of the "hippies" and their activities.
> > >
> > >
> > > Fred Shapiro
> > >
>
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> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>


-- 
-Wilson
-----
All say, "How hard it is that we have to die!"---a strange complaint to
come from the mouths of people who have had to live.
-Mark Twain

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