[Ads-l] hot mike/mic

ADSGarson O'Toole adsgarsonotoole at GMAIL.COM
Tue Jan 25 20:07:23 EST 2022


Are my posts making it to the list? Apparently, my posts are sometimes
being filtered into spam. I posted a February 17, 1930 citation five
hours ago.
Garson


On Tue, Jan 25, 2022 at 8:02 PM Ben Zimmer <bgzimmer at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Thanks, Peter. Clearly the same list of radio jargon was floating around.
> From slightly earlier in 1930:
>
> ---
> https://www.newspapers.com/clip/93465842/hot-or-live-mike/
> BInghamton (NY) Press, Feb. 25, 1930, p. 15, col. 2
> Today's definition of broadcasting studio terms: Hot (or live) mike -- A
> microphone in operation or in readiness to pick up a sound.
> ---
>
> On Tue, Jan 25, 2022 at 7:37 PM Peter Reitan <pjreitan at hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Daily Illini, April 5, 1930.
> >
> >
> > https://idnc.library.illinois.edu/?a=d&d=DIL19300405.2.109&srpos=2&e=-------en-20--1--img-txIN----------
> > ________________________________
> > From: American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU> on behalf of Ben
> > Zimmer <bgzimmer at GMAIL.COM>
> > Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2022 10:55:46 AM
> > To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
> > Subject: hot mike/mic
> >
> > ---------------------- Information from the mail header
> > -----------------------
> > Sender:       American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
> > Poster:       Ben Zimmer <bgzimmer at GMAIL.COM>
> > Subject:      hot mike/mic
> >
> > -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > I'm researching "hot mike/mic" for an upcoming Wall St. Journal column.
> > OED3 includes a cite for "hot mike" from 1937 in its entry for "hot" (sense
> > 9h: "electrically connected or charged; turned on; live"). So far I've
> > antedated that to 1930:
> >
> > ---
> >
> > https://worldradiohistory.com/Archive-Broadcast-Advertising/Broadcast-Adver=
> > tising-1930-04.pdf
> > <https://worldradiohistory.com/Archive-Broadcast-Advertising/Broadcast-Adver=tising-1930-04.pdf>
> > Broadcast Advertising, Apr. 1930, p. 16, col. 2
> > Broadcasting has its own language, a few words of which are quoted here
> > from the glossary that is running serially in the "Voice of Columbia."
> > "Hot mike" -- A microphone in operation.
> > ---
> > https://www.newspapers.com/clip/93427038/hot-mike/
> > Bangor (Me.) Daily News, Feb. 10, 1931, p. 9, col. 7
> > A glossary listing words and phrases peculiar to radio engineering has been
> > compiled by Engineer Irving Reis -- the Dr. Vizetelly of the Columbia
> > Broadcasting System=E2=80=99s technical staff. [...]
> > Hot Mike -- Microphone with current applied. A "dead mike=E2=80=9D is one
> > t=
> > hat is
> > shut off.
> > ---
> >
> > Can anyone find anything earlier? An Internet Archive search suggests it
> > may be in the Oct.  1929 issue of National Radio News, but that item is
> > currently unavailable:
> >
> >
> > https://archive.org/search.php?query=3D%22hot+mike%22&sin=3DTXT&and[]=3Dyea=
> > r%3A%221929%22
> > <https://archive.org/search.php?query=3D%22hot+mike%22&sin=3DTXT&and[]=3Dyea=r%3A%221929%22>
> > https://archive.org/details/NRNV02N03Oct29/NRN_V02_N03_Oct29
> >
> > I don't see "hot mike" skimming through the PDF for that issue here:
> >
> > https://worldradiohistory.com/Archive-National-Radio-News/NRN-1929-10.pdf
> >
> > --bgz
> >
> >
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
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------------------------------------------------------------
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