[Edling] Beall's List of Predatory Publishers 2017

Dave Sayers dave.sayers at cantab.net
Sun Jun 24 16:26:38 EDT 2018


Hi all,

Followup to my message last year on the excellent free resource 'Beall's list' of 
predatory journals (now sadly mothballed due to legal pressure and lack of university 
legal support). There's a new list and it seems an important successor to Beall's 
(though irritatingly proprietary): Cabell’s Blacklist, https://wp.me/p84tsU-d00.

Aside from any such lists though, there's some basic free advice I'd give to any grad 
student or early-career researcher on choosing a journal: 1) No legitimate journal 
will *ever* contact you out of the blue asking you to write for them; 2) Ask at least 
two senior colleagues whether they would publish in the journal you're considering (I 
say at least two because, naming no names, I have seen some near misses...!).

Stay safe folks.

Dave

--
Dr. Dave Sayers, ORCID no. 0000-0003-1124-7132
Senior Lecturer, Dept Humanities, Sheffield Hallam University | www.shu.ac.uk
Honorary Research Fellow, Cardiff University & WISERD | www.wiserd.ac.uk
Communications Secretary, BAAL Language Policy group | www.langpol.ac.uk
dave.sayers at cantab.net | http://shu.academia.edu/DaveSayers


On 03/01/2017 19:08, Dave Sayers wrote:
> Today (3 Jan) saw the release of the latest edition of this excellent free resource, 
> on the website 'Scholarly Open Access', maintained voluntarily by Jeffrey Beall, a 
> librarian at the University of Colorado, Denver: https://goo.gl/qk2o6W.
> 
> The issue of fraud in academic publishing recently made the mainstream news in a New 
> York Times article which has been doing the rounds: https://goo.gl/A1G9jI. (Beall is 
> quoted in that article.) The rapid increase in fake or otherwise shady publishers is 
> alarming and a cause for heightened wariness, especially rise of 'hijacked' 
> publications as noted on scholarlyoa.com.
> 
> I would add that there's some debate out there about Beall's methods - particularly 
> concerns about proficiency in English sometimes being a factor in determining the 
> authenticity of a journal. This can potentially cast doubt on journals in countries 
> with distinct varieties of English, somewhat unfairly. (The varied debate about his 
> methods is captured quite nicely within Beall's Wikipedia entry: 
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeffrey_Beall.) Amusingly on that note, the NYT article 
> linked above ends with a correction about a typo in another article!
> 
> Anyway, in the main, scholarlyoa.com is a very useful resource to help piece together 
> the authenticity or otherwise of a publisher/publication, and this year's updated 
> List is an essential resource - albeit with the above caveats.
> 
> And please, as with so many of these things, if you find it useful yourself then tell 
> your grad students and junior colleagues! Too many inexperienced folks get duped by 
> obsequious emails from predatory publishers, and they're typically the worst affected 
> by the scams, both financially and because usually once you publish with one journal 
> you can't publish the same data with another (legitimate) journal.
> 
> Happy new year all, stay safe out there!
> 
> Dave
> 
> -- 
> Dr. Dave Sayers, ORCID no. 0000-0003-1124-7132
> Senior Lecturer, Dept Humanities, Sheffield Hallam University | www.shu.ac.uk
> Honorary Research Fellow, Cardiff University & WISERD | www.wiserd.ac.uk
> dave.sayers at cantab.net | http://shu.academia.edu/DaveSayers
> 
> 
> ---
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