<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Tahoma
}
--></style></head>
<body class='hmmessage'><div dir='ltr'>
<div><font size="3" style="font-size:12pt;"><br></font></div><div><div><span style="font-size: 12pt; ">Hello Pattie,</span></div><div><font size="3"><br></font></div><div><font size="3">Here is my contribution to Steve Wechsler's query: </font></div><div><font size="3"><br></font></div><div><font size="3">Notions such as "all of us came back" in Otomi, a language family of Mexico, are conveyed by a construction involving two juxtaposed clauses, one being a depictive clause referring to the quantification of the subject "we being all" and a main clause "we returned". </font></div><div><font size="3"> </font></div><div><font size="3">Data from Northern Otomi, variety of San Ildefonso Tultepec</font></div><div><font size="3"> </font></div><div><font size="3">(1)</font></div><div><font size="3">d=<b>gatho</b>=he                          d=penk=he</font></div><div><font size="3">1.INCPL.REALIS=be.all=PL.EXCL  1.CPL=return=PL.EXCL</font></div><div><font size="3">We all came back</font></div><div><font size="3"><br></font></div><div><span style="font-size: 12pt; ">The lexical item which in (1) is a verb, in (2) is a determiner.</span></div><div><span style="font-size: 12pt; "><br></span></div><div><font size="3">(2)</font></div><div><font size="3">pa                bi=<y><u>a</u>= [<b>gatho</b>                                               nu=ya    khi]</font></div><div><font size="3">PURPOSIVE    3.CPL=<SECONDARY.STEM>bury.BOUND[3.OBJ]=all  DEF=PL   person</font></div><div><font size="3">To bury all people.</font></div><div><font size="3"> </font></div><div><font size="3">The  treatment of "all" as a verb is an unsurprising one in Mesoamerican languages.       </font></div><div><font size="3">Hope this helps, </font></div><div><font size="3"><br></font></div><div><font size="3">Very best, </font></div><div><font size="3">Enrique</font></div><div><font size="3"><br></font></div><div>..............................................................................................................................................</div><div>Enrique L. Palancar</div><div><br></div><div>SeDyL-CELIA</div><div>CNRS (UMR 8202)</div><div>7 rue Guy Mquet </div><div>94801 Villejuif Cedex, France </div><div><br></div><div>Surrey Morphology Group</div><div>School of English and Languages</div><div>Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences (J1)</div><div>University of Surrey,</div><div>Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH</div><div><br></div><div>Tel. +44 (0)1483 682856</div><div><www.surrey.ac.uk/english/smg/people/></div><div><surrey.academia.edu/EnriquePalancar></div><div><enriquepalancar.weebly.com/></div><div><div id="SkyDrivePlaceholder"></div><hr id="stopSpelling">Date: Fri, 28 Sep 2012 23:10:11 -0500<br>From: pepps@MAIL.UTEXAS.EDU<br>Subject: nominal-internal person agreement<br>To: LINGTYP@LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG<br><br>
<style><!--
.ExternalClass blockquote, .ExternalClass dl, .ExternalClass ul, .ExternalClass ol, .ExternalClass li
{padding-top:0;padding-bottom:0;}

--></style><title>nominal-internal person
agreement</title>
<div><font color="#000000">Hello all,<br>
<br>
This query is on behalf of Steve Wechsler:<br>
<br>
It has been noted that (at least some) Bantu languages have person<br>
agreement inside certain Quantified Noun Phrases:<br>
<br>
Thina s-onke   si-fik-ile
           (Zu<span></span>lu; Doke 1963:94, cited in<br>
Baker 2008:115)<br>
we     1pl-all
   1pl-arrive-perf<br>
'We have all arrived.'<br>
<br>
The quantifier onke 'all' agrees with thina 'we' in person (and<br>
number).  This is said to be typologically rare since adnominals
such<br>
as quantifiers do not normally agree in person.  I would be
interested<br>
in any examples of such apparently nominal-internal person
agreement<br>
in Bantu or other languages.  In particular, I wonder if phrases
like<br>
[we 1pl-all] can occur in all nominal positions in the sentence
(such<br>
as object position), or rather tend to be sentence-initial.<br>
<br>
Thanks,<br>
Steve Wechsler<br>
</font><font color="#0E37A5"><u>wechsler@mail.utexas.edu</u></font></div></div></div>                                           </div></body>
</html>