13.1912, Qs: Phonetics, Phrase Terminal Tags

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Sat Jul 13 04:10:38 UTC 2002


LINGUIST List:  Vol-13-1912. Sat Jul 13 2002. ISSN: 1068-4875.

Subject: 13.1912, Qs: Phonetics, Phrase Terminal Tags

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=================================Directory=================================

1)
Date:  Fri, 12 Jul 2002 14:43:07 +0000
From:  Remy Viredaz <remy.viredaz at bluewin.ch>
Subject:  Phonetics: s/z/h Alteration

2)
Date:  Fri, 12 Jul 2002 16:17:58 +0000
From:  Stephen  Levey <stve123 at hotmail.com>
Subject:  phrase terminal tags and stuff like that

-------------------------------- Message 1 -------------------------------

Date:  Fri, 12 Jul 2002 14:43:07 +0000
From:  Remy Viredaz <remy.viredaz at bluewin.ch>
Subject:  Phonetics: s/z/h Alteration

After my Summary <http://linguistlist.org/issues/13/13-1596.html>
appeared, I was made aware of a few corrigenda and
addenda. (Quotations below are not verbatim.)

Paul Kiparsky <kiparsky at csli.Stanford.EDU>:
Charles Ferguson, "From esses to aiches: identifying pathways of
diachronic change", in W. Croft et al. (eds), Studies in Typology and
Diachrony (Benjamins 1990), argues that there are two basic types of s
> h sound change. [In some languages such as Ancient Greek and modern
Yakut, the change begins in V_V position and spreads to #_V and
possibly other contexts; in Spanish, on the contrary, it begins in
syllable-final position and extends to word-final.]

Ross Clark (FOA DALSL) <r.clark at auckland.ac.nz>:
The change s > h in Polynesian is not limited to the East Polynesian
subgroup but also affects Tongan and its close relative Niuean. Tongan
has a new /s/, as a result of a recent change of *t before i; 18th and
19th sources still show an affricate, written ch or j, for that sound,
whereas s > h was already completed. A similar situation obtains in
Niuean.

Marc Picard <picard at vax2.concordia.ca>:
The change *s > *h > ... > n in initial position in Arapaho was first
recognized and explained (as *h > *ç > *y > *l > n) by Marc Picard,
"On the evidence of PA *s to Arapaho /n/", International Journal of
American Linguistics 60, 1994, 295-299. Pentland 1998 added some more
examples of that change.

I do thank these authors for the information.




-------------------------------- Message 2 -------------------------------

Date:  Fri, 12 Jul 2002 16:17:58 +0000
From:  Stephen  Levey <stve123 at hotmail.com>
Subject:  phrase terminal tags and stuff like that

As part of a sociolinguistic investigation, I am looking at variation
in children's use of phrase terminal tags e.g. 'and stuff like that',
'and everything', etc, appended to phrases. I am interested in the
occurrence of similar phenomena in languages other than English,
particularly non-Western ones. Does anyone have any examples?

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