14.524, Qs: Drum Vocables, Trace Effects

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Fri Feb 21 14:38:06 UTC 2003


LINGUIST List:  Vol-14-524. Fri Feb 21 2003. ISSN: 1068-4875.

Subject: 14.524, Qs: Drum Vocables, Trace Effects

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1)
Date:  Thu, 20 Feb 2003 00:46:23 +0000
From:  Aniruddh Patel <apatel at nsi.edu>
Subject:  drum vocables

2)
Date:  Thu, 20 Feb 2003 22:16:36 +0000
From:  Hiroyuki Tanaka <htanaka at kwansei.ac.jp>
Subject:  Pseudo-that-trace effect?

-------------------------------- Message 1 -------------------------------

Date:  Thu, 20 Feb 2003 00:46:23 +0000
From:  Aniruddh Patel <apatel at nsi.edu>
Subject:  drum vocables

Dear Linguist List,

We are doing research on the acoustic and perceptual resemblance
between drum sounds and the spoken syllables used to name them in
North Indian tabla music.

We would be most grateful for input on the following questions:

Is anyone aware of previous published research on this topic?

What other cultures have organized systems of vocables for naming
drum/percussion sounds? References to published papers or books are
especially appreciated.

Thank you,

Aniruddh Patel & John Iversen
The Neurosciences Institute
San Diego, CA


-------------------------------- Message 2 -------------------------------

Date:  Thu, 20 Feb 2003 22:16:36 +0000
From:  Hiroyuki Tanaka <htanaka at kwansei.ac.jp>
Subject:  Pseudo-that-trace effect?

Dear Colleagues,

I've been curious about the fact discussed in
Stowell's dissertation (citing the discussion in
Kayne (_Connectedness and Binary Branching_:ch.1))
that a finite clause in English whose subject is
wh-moved must be adjacent to a Case-assigning verb.
Consider the contrast between (2) and (3):

(1) John said [to Mary] [(that) Bill would help him]
(2) ?*Who did John say [to Mary] [t would help him]?
(3) Who did John say [t would help him]?

If this phenomenon is related to Case at all, a natural
question is whether a subject-extracted CP somehow
behaves like a noun phrase, which must be adjacent to
its governing verb. (BTW, I've heard the (2)-(3)
asymmetry referred to as the `pseudo-that-trace effect'.
Does anyone know the origin of this terminology?)

In this light, I would like to know how this constraint
interacts with the fact that it is hard to place the
finite clause before the PP argument:

(4) ?*John said [(that) Bill would help him] [to Mary].

My question is, can the `adjacency requirement' on a
subject-extracted CP override the ban on V-CP-PP
ordering? That is, is the following (5) any better
than (4) above?

(5) Who did John say [t would help him] [to Mary]?

I'm sure judgments on these kinds of sentences vary
among individuals, but I would appreciate any information
about the judgments from native speakers and/or pointers
to references; I would also appreciate theoretical
discussion on this topic as well.

Please reply directly to me. I will post a summary if
appropriate.

Thanks,
Hiroyuki Tanaka
Kwansei Gakuin University
htanaka at kwansei.ac.jp

Subject-Language: English; Code: ENG

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