18.130, Calls: Historical Ling, Ling & Lit, Socioling/Netherlands

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LINGUIST List: Vol-18-130. Sun Jan 14 2007. ISSN: 1068 - 4875.

Subject: 18.130, Calls: Historical Ling, Ling & Lit, Socioling/Netherlands

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1)
Date: 11-Jan-2007
From: Victorina Gonzalez-Diaz < v.gonzalez-diaz at liverpool.ac.uk >
Subject: Rebels or Reactionaries? 

	
-------------------------Message 1 ---------------------------------- 
Date: Sun, 14 Jan 2007 22:32:32
From: Victorina Gonzalez-Diaz < v.gonzalez-diaz at liverpool.ac.uk >
Subject: Rebels or Reactionaries? 
 


Full Title: Rebels or Reactionaries? 
Short Title: LModE3:Workshop 

Date: 29-Aug-2007 - 29-Aug-2007
Location: Leiden, Netherlands 
Contact Person: Victorina Gonzalez
Meeting Email: v.gonzalez-diaz at liverpool.ac.uk
Web Site: http://www.lucl.leidenuniv.nl/index.php3?m=15&c=469&garb=0.5213537158101468&session= 

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics; Ling & Literature; Sociolinguistics 

Subject Language(s): English (eng)

Call Deadline: 28-Feb-2007 

Meeting Description:

Literary scholarship of the past 20 years has argued that the Romantics were neither as homogeneous nor as innovative as previously perceived; in many cases they were reactionary compared to the Enlightenment writers and in some cases 'it was the classical... style that was... linked with republicanism' (Butler 1981:5). Whether this claim, which is based largely on writers' literary and political ideologies, is also true for their language-use remains largely untested. 

This workshop invites participants to explore the language of the Romantic era in two different yet closely related areas, i.e. stylistics and language-change. What is the balance between innovation and conservatism in the language and/or style of writers of the period (whether considered as individuals or social networks)? How - if at all - does their language-use relate to their ideology? Contributions addressing these and related questions will be welcome. 

Rebels or Reactionaries? Romantic Writers in the Vanguard / Rearguard of Contemporary Linguistic Change

29 August 2007, University of Leiden

Convenors:     
Sylvia Adamson (University of Sheffield) 
Anita Auer (University of Leiden) 
Victorina González-Díaz (University of Liverpool)

Traditionally, the transition from the Enlightenment to the Romantic period was known as the 'Romantic revolution' and 'romantic' writers were thought of as iconoclastic in terms of the social, moral and literary conventions of the time, particularly in comparison to their Enlightenment predecessors and contemporaries. In literary history, the change was dated from the appearance of Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads (1798) which announces a shift from the Enlightenment's use of a highly literate form of Standard English to the Romantic aim, to represent ''incidents and situations from common life, and to relate or describe them, throughout, as far as possible, in a selection of language really used by men'' (Wordsworth, Preface to Lyrical Ballads). In CHEL4, Adamson considers the implications of this aim for developments in stylistic history (Adamson 1998:589-692) and Denison suggests its impact on linguistic history when he hypothesises that certain changes in English syntax gained currency through 'the young iconoclasts of the Southey/Coleridge circle' seizing on previously 'unrespectable' forms as a way of 'siding with the politically and linguistically dispossessed' (Denison 1998:154).

Literary scholarship of the past 20 years, however, has argued for a different picture, suggesting that the Romantics were neither as homogeneous nor as innovative as previously perceived; in many cases they were reactionary compared to the Enlightenment writers and in some cases 'it was the classical... style that was... linked with republicanism' (Butler 1981:5). Whether this claim, which is based largely on writers' literary and political ideologies, is also true for their language-use remains largely untested. 

This workshop invites participants to explore the language of the Romantic era in two different yet closely related areas, i.e. stylistics and language-change. What is the balance between innovation and conservatism in the language and/or style of writers of the period (whether considered as individuals or social networks)? How - if at all - does their language-use relate to their ideology? Contributions addressing these and related questions will be welcome. 

References:

Adamson, Sylvia (1998). ''Literary Language''. In Suzanne Romaine (ed.) The   Cambridge History of the English Language. Vol. IV, 1776-1997 [CHEL4]. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 589-692. 

Denison, David (1998). ''Syntax''. In CHEL4, pp 92-329, esp.pp.150-158.

Butler, Marilyn (1981). Romantics, Rebels and Reactionaries. English Literature and its Background 1760-1830. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Email the paper abstracts to:

Anita Auer (A.Auer at let.leidenuniv.nl) and Victorina González-Díaz (v.gonzalez-diaz at liverpool.ac.uk)

Deadline for abstract submission:            28 February 2007

Notification of acceptance of abstract:     no later than 15 March 2007

This workshop is part of the Third International Conference on Late Modern English. It will take place on Wednesday 29 August 2007 (Faculty of Arts, University of Leiden, The Netherlands), the day before the official start of the conference. Participants will be asked to submit the full version of their papers (in electronic form) two weeks before the workshop takes place (15 August 2007). The organisers of the workshop will be in charge of circulating the papers amongst the participants and of nominating 'a reviewer' for every paper. The reviewer will be assigned to comment on one paper; s/he will be asked to prepare questions to be asked after the presentation of the paper. Participants will have 10 minutes to present their contribution and 15 minutes for the reviewer's questions and discussion.




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