19.1811, Confs: Cognitive Science, Computational Linguistics/USA

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LINGUIST List: Vol-19-1811. Fri Jun 06 2008. ISSN: 1068 - 4875.

Subject: 19.1811, Confs: Cognitive Science, Computational Linguistics/USA

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1)
Date: 05-Jun-2008
From: Ted Strauss < ted.strauss at gmail.com >
Subject: Tutorial: Computational Modeling of Spoken Language Processing

 

	
-------------------------Message 1 ---------------------------------- 
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008 10:47:36
From: Ted Strauss [ted.strauss at gmail.com]
Subject: Tutorial: Computational Modeling of Spoken Language Processing
E-mail this message to a friend:
http://linguistlist.org/issues/emailmessage/verification.cfm?iss=19-1811.html&submissionid=181007&topicid=4&msgnumber=1  

Tutorial: Computational Modeling of Spoken Language Processing 

Date: 23-Jul-2008 - 23-Jul-2008 
Location: Washington, D.C., USA 
Contact: Ted Strauss 
Contact Email: ted.strauss at gmail.com 
Meeting URL: http://www.ccc.utexas.edu/cogsci08/tutorials.html 

Linguistic Field(s): 
Cognitive Science; Computational Linguistics; Phonetics; Phonology;
Psycholinguistics 

Meeting Description: 

This 1-day tutorial focuses on the theory and practice of computational modeling
of human speech perception.  Models allow concrete tests of theories which are
crucial for complex domains such as speech perception.  Attendees will be
introduced to modeling theory and practice through hands-on exercises beginning
with a selection of important findings in speech perception and spoken word
recognition and progressing to independent mini-projects.  Attendees will learn
to use a recently developed program that allows average computer users to
conduct sophisticated perceptual simulations.  This program, called jTRACE, is
based on the highly influential TRACE model (James McClelland & Jeffrey Elman),
which implements many of the basic assumptions of models of speech processing. 

Computational Modeling of Spoken Language Processing: A hands-on tutorial 
 
A tutorial on the science of human speech perception presented at the 30th
Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society   
 
Coordinates: 
July 23rd, 2008 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington D.C. 
Register at www.ccc.utexas.edu/cogsci08/registration.html 
 
Description 
This 1-day tutorial focuses on the theory and practice of computational modeling
of human speech perception.  Models allow concrete tests of theories which are
crucial for complex domains such as speech perception.  Attendees will be
introduced to modeling theory and practice through hands-on exercises beginning
with a selection of important findings in speech perception and spoken word
recognition and progressing to independent mini-projects.  Attendees will learn
to use a recently developed program that allows average computer users to
conduct sophisticated perceptual simulations.  This program, called jTRACE, is
based on the highly influential TRACE model (James McClelland & Jeffrey Elman),
which implements many of the basic assumptions of models of speech processing.   
 
Who should attend? 
Psycholinguists who want to learn to do their own TRACE simulations. 
Psychologists interested in models of language, in particular phonemes and
words. Linguists curious about psycholinguistic theories. Neuroscientists
interested in neurally inspired models of speech processing. 
 
Instructors 
James Magnuson, Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut 
Daniel Mirman, Post-doctoral Researcher, University of Connecticut 
Ted Strauss, Master's Candidate, New School for Social Research







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