19.1814, Calls: Computational Linguistics/USA; General Linguistics/USA

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LINGUIST List: Vol-19-1814. Fri Jun 06 2008. ISSN: 1068 - 4875.

Subject: 19.1814, Calls: Computational Linguistics/USA; General Linguistics/USA

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1)
Date: 05-Jun-2008
From: Philip McCarthy < pmccarthy at mail.psyc.memphis.edu >
Subject: Florida AI Research Conference 

2)
Date: 03-Jun-2008
From: Gabriela Caballero < gcaballe at berkeley.edu >
Subject: Berkeley Workshop on Affix Ordering

 

	
-------------------------Message 1 ---------------------------------- 
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008 11:13:08
From: Philip McCarthy [pmccarthy at mail.psyc.memphis.edu]
Subject: Florida AI Research Conference
E-mail this message to a friend:
http://linguistlist.org/issues/emailmessage/verification.cfm?iss=19-1814.html&submissionid=181011&topicid=3&msgnumber=1  

Full Title: Florida AI Research Conference 
Short Title: FLAIRS 

Date: 19-May-2009 - 21-May-2009
Location: Sanibel Island, USA 
Contact Person: Philip McCarthy
Meeting Email: pmccarthy at mail.psyc.memphis.edu
Web Site: http://www.flairs-22.info/ 

Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics 

Subject Language(s): English (eng)

Call Deadline: 29-Jun-2008 

Meeting Description:

The 22nd International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society
Conference (FLAIRS-22) will be held 19th-21st May 2009 at the Sundial Beach and
Golf Resort, on Sanibel Island, Florida, USA. FLAIRS-22 will feature technical
papers, special tracks, and invited speakers. 

Call for Papers

We are inviting proposals for special tracks for The 22nd International Florida
Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference (FLAIRS-22). FLAIRS will be
held 19th-21st May 2009 at the Sundial Beach and Golf Resort, on Sanibel Island,
Florida, USA. The FLAIRS special tracks are held in parallel with the general
conference. A special track consists of a group of papers in a sub-discipline of
artificial intelligence. Special tracks are published in the conference
proceedings, and the tracks run in parallel with the general conference. Special
tracks provide researchers in focused areas the opportunity to meet and present
their work, and offer a forum for interaction among the broader community of
artificial intelligence researchers. Topics of interest are in all areas of
artificial intelligence.

Sanibel is a barrier island lying on the Gulf coast of Florida, near Fort Myers.
Although an island in name, Sanibel is linked to the mainland by a causeway and
a bridge. Sanibel boasts beautiful beaches and is also home to numerous
alligators and even the occasional crocodile. Importantly, Sanibel also features
numerous distractions for researchers eager to discuss collaborations, methods,
directions, and approaches; for details, visit
http://www.sanibelisland.com/recreation.html . 

The FLAIRS special tracks are held in parallel with the general conference. A
special track consists of a group of papers in a sub-discipline of artificial
intelligence. Special tracks are an integral part of each FLAIRS conference:
their papers are required to meet the same standards and are published in the
conference proceedings, and the tracks run in parallel with the general
conference. Special tracks provide researchers in focused areas the opportunity
to meet and present their work, and offer a forum for interaction among the
broader community of artificial intelligence researchers. Submission of
proposals for special tracks at the conference is now invited. Topics of
interest are in all areas of artificial intelligence. Last year's FLAIRS
featured special tracks such as Applied Natural Language Processing, Artificial
Intelligence Education, and Intelligent Tutoring Systems. 

Special track chairs may submit papers to their own tracks. Those papers will be
reviewed by two members of the special track's program committee and two members
of the general conference program committee. The decision of acceptance will be
made by the conference program co-chairs. Accepted papers will be published and
presented as part of the special track. 

Proposal Instructions 
Proposals must be submitted to the EasyChair conference system (
http://www.easychair.org/conferences?conf=flairs22). They must include the
following information: 

- Title of the special track. 
- The track's organizational structure. How many submissions do you expect to
receive and how many papers do you plan to have? A track may have up to 4
sessions, with 3 papers per session. Special tracks that fail to attract
sufficient papers will be merged into the general conference. 
- Names and contact information for yourself and your track's program committee,
who have all agreed to serve on the committee. You should have enough members
for each paper to be reviewed by 4 reviewers. 
- Promotional plans and materials, including a draft call for papers, specific
plans for publicizing the special track, and the names of any speakers you are
considering inviting. (FLAIRS cannot guarantee any form of financial support for
special track invited speakers at this stage.) 
- Summary of any special tracks you have organized for FLAIRS over the last two
years. In particular, what track(s) have you organized, how many submissions
were received, and how many papers were accepted? 

Acceptance of proposals includes: quality of proposal; potential for success of
the track, including the perceived level of interest to the AI community and the
appropriateness of the organizing committee; and whether the track was held at
prior FLAIRS conferences. For more details, contact Phil McCarthy
(pmccarthy[@]mail.psyc.memphis.edu). 

Dates and Deadlines: 
Proposals for special tracks: 29th June 2008 
Notification of acceptance of special tracks: 10th July 2008 
Submission of papers: 23rd November 2008 
Notification of acceptance: 25th January 2009 
Camera ready versions due: 25th February 2009 

FLAIRS-22 is hosted by the Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society, in
cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.



	
-------------------------Message 2 ---------------------------------- 
Date: Fri, 06 Jun 2008 11:13:19
From: Gabriela Caballero [gcaballe at berkeley.edu]
Subject: Berkeley Workshop on Affix Ordering
E-mail this message to a friend:
http://linguistlist.org/issues/emailmessage/verification.cfm?iss=19-1814.html&submissionid=180821&topicid=3&msgnumber=2 
	

Full Title: Berkeley Workshop on Affix Ordering 

Date: 04-Oct-2008 - 04-Oct-2008
Location: Berkeley, California, USA 
Contact Person: Gabriela Caballero
Meeting Email: affix at berkeley.edu
Web Site:
http://linguistics.berkeley.edu/~bwao/Berkeley%20Workshop%20on%20Affix%20Ordering%20%3A%20Call.html


Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics 

Call Deadline: 01-Aug-2008 

Meeting Description:

A workshop on the complexity of affix ordering in specific languages/language
families, empirical challenges for current theories, and unified explanations
for the range of cross-linguistic affix ordering patterns attested to date. 

Call for Papers

The Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley and the
Department of Linguistics at the University of Toronto invite abstracts for
submission to a workshop on the theme of ''Affix Ordering'', to be held at the
University of California, Berkeley on October 4th, 2008. We are pleased to
announce that the workshop will include presentations by Sharon Inkelas (UC
Berkeley) and Keren Rice (University of Toronto).
	
The recent literature contains diverse proposals as to what principles underlie
the surface linear arrangement of morphemes in a word (e.g., semantic factors,
syntactic scope, psycholinguistic processing-based factors, prosodic factors,
morphophonological subcategorization frames, and morphological templates), not
all of which are mutually exclusive, but whose precise nature and possibilities
for interaction remain to be worked out. The study of affix ordering thus forms
an ideal testing ground for theories of morphology and its interfaces with other
components of the grammar. Even as documentation of lesser studied languages
brings to light new patterns that challenge previous assumptions about possible
affix ordering systems (e.g. free, variable prefix ordering in Chintang), closer
study of languages previously considered arbitrary and templatic has revealed
patterns of a more universal semantic or syntactic nature (e.g. Athabaskan).  
	
This workshop aims at facilitating collaboration between theorists, language
specialists, typologists, and anyone interested in the study of affix order. We
invite papers from any perspective which explore the complexity of affix
ordering in specific languages, present empirical challenges for current
theories, and/or seek unified explanations for the range of cross-linguistic
affix ordering patterns attested to date. Papers presenting original data from
lesser studied languages are particularly encouraged. Some possible questions
include, but are by no means limited to, the following: What are the limits (if
any) of semantics, syntax, and phonology in determining affix order? How do
these limits manifest themselves universally and/or in specific languages? In
cases where multiple factors interact in the determination of affix order, what
is the nature of this interaction? Templates have often been used as a
descriptive rather than formal mechanism. But to the extent that some affix
ordering systems are genuinely templatic, what is the nature of the internal
structure of morphological templates? Are there cross-linguistic constraints on
these structures? Are some types of affix ordering patterns characteristic of
certain kinds of morphological systems (e.g. inflectional, agglutinating,
polysynthetic)? What aspects of affix ordering are to be modeled synchronically
in the grammar, versus determined by grammar-external forces (e.g. processing,
language change)?

Abstracts (pdf files only) must be sent as attachments to: affix at berkeley.edu
In your email please include: title of paper, your full name, and affiliation.

Submission deadline: August 1st, 2008
Notification of acceptance: August 15, 2008

Supported by The Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities

Organizers: Gabriela Caballero (UC Berkeley), Yuni Kim (UC Berkeley), and Tanya
Slavin (U Toronto)


 





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