25.3356, Qs: Sentence intonation from a typological perspective

The LINGUIST List linguist at linguistlist.org
Sun Aug 24 05:02:56 UTC 2014


LINGUIST List: Vol-25-3356. Sun Aug 24 2014. ISSN: 1069 - 4875.

Subject: 25.3356, Qs: Sentence intonation from a typological perspective

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Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 01:02:49
From: Moreno Vuleta [spiritusdilutus at hotmail.com]
Subject: Sentence intonation from a typological perspective

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http://linguistlist.org/issues/emailmessage/verification.cfm?iss=25-3356.html&submissionid=35951737&topicid=8&msgnumber=1
 
Dear Linguist list,

I am interested in delving into a specific research topic - rising intonation
in interrogative questions - a cross-linguistic perspective. I am curious to
establish whether this feature is common to all living languages of today (if
it indeed is) due to interaction between language and emotions, or due to this
being a common typological unit - a typeme. If it is the latter case, I want
to make an effort in clarifying how it came to be - interaction with genetic
linguistics and language genesis most possible here.

As far as I know, there has been a single work in linguistics to tackle this
topic - ''Tone'' (2006) by Yip Moira from Cambridge University Press.

I would like to ask some expert advice and latest insight on this topic, if
there have been other researches conducted on this matter up to now.

In addition, I would like to know whether a certain team of linguists or an
institute of linguistics anywhere in the world is already running a major
project on this research matter. 
Cheers,

MV
 

Linguistic Field(s): Typology






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