=?utf-8?Q?27.3567, _Diss:_Multilingualism_at_School:_Linguistic_Pract?= ices in a Ukrainian Immigration Community in Paraná/Brazil

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LINGUIST List: Vol-27-3567. Sun Sep 11 2016. ISSN: 1069 - 4875.

Subject: 27.3567, Diss: Multilingualism at School: Linguistic Practices in a Ukrainian Immigration Community in Paraná/Brazil

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Date: Sun, 11 Sep 2016 21:24:10
From: Jakeline Semechechem [jakeline.semechechem at gmail.com]
Subject: Multilingualism at School: Linguistic Practices in a Ukrainian Immigration Community in Paraná/Brazil

 
Institution: Universidade Estadual de Maringá 
Program: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Letras (Estudos Linguísticos) 
Dissertation Status: Completed 
Degree Date: 2016 

Author: Jakeline Semechechem

Dissertation Title: Multilingualism at School: Linguistic Practices in a
Ukrainian Immigration Community in Paraná/Brazil 

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics

Subject Language(s): Ukrainian (ukr)


Dissertation Director(s):
Neiva Maria Jung

Dissertation Abstract:

The present linguistic ethnography research investigates how students,
teachers and members of a school community as a whole engender the
socio-political space of a Brazilian immigrant language, Ukrainian, as well as
that of multilingualism, in a public school situated in a rural multilingual
community in the municipality of Prudentópolis, in the southeast of the state
of Paraná, in the south of Brazil. The overarching theoretical framework
shaping the study comprises an understanding of language as social practice,
multilingualism as a set of ideologically informed communicative resources
which make up our linguistic repertoires; of language practices as semiotic
activity occurring through the use of language; of linguistic markets that are
not unified and of language policies being forged by language practices; and
language ideologies. Data analysis describes how students, teachers and school
personnel harness their communicative resources in Ukrainian during language
practices occurring in school, both during and outside of class, and how,
within the community, value is assigned to such resources. The data generated
allowed us to observe similar as well as distinct processes in place in both
classroom groups. Although in both groups practices involving the Ukrainian
language were implemented by students mostly in conversations which were
subordinate to classroom activities and in participations which could be
qualified as exuberant, in the sixth-grade group, some boys would align
themselves to conversational floors in Ukrainian, in debates regarding the
lesson plan during language class, and the floor was supported, on such
occasions, by teachers as well as classmates. Furthermore, in the third-year
of high school group, considering the higher frequency of subordinate
conversations taking place, the use of Ukrainian was even more noticeable.
Outside the classroom environment, language practices involving the Ukrainian
language would also occur between members of the school staff and teachers,
and texts in Cyrillic were seen to circulate around the school community.
Regarding the variation of language practices observed between both groups,
one still in its elementary school years and the other about to graduate from
high school, besides being dependent on students' age, on the linguistic
repertoires of participants, and on the different ways of participating in
class, this variation points to a local language policy that allows for the
use of Ukrainian and of multilingualism on occasions, during class and in
school as a whole, as well as in other contexts, such as spaces assigned for
official languages. Within the community there are Ukrainian languages
associated to distinct values and social groups. The local Ukrainian language,
part of the linguistic repertoire of a majority of students, teachers and
members of the school staff, is associated with a local identity of
Ukraineness, with the rural context and with local social practices. It
suggests membership and is incipiently valued as a local and translocal
cultural product, while for a small group of people within the community,
standard Ukrainian is valued as local and translocal linguistic capital and
denotes translocal mobility. The research looks at the production of the
socio-political space of Ukrainian in the school in question, in which
language practices, language values and underlying language ideologies create
tensions in local language policies towards monolingualism as well as
multilingualism. The socio-political space of the Ukrainian language and of
multilingualism in the school supports local values of Ukrainian languages and
of the community culture.




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