27.3761, Calls: Disc Analysis, Historical Ling, Pragmatics, Socioling, Text/Corpus Ling/UK

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LINGUIST List: Vol-27-3761. Thu Sep 22 2016. ISSN: 1069 - 4875.

Subject: 27.3761, Calls: Disc Analysis, Historical Ling, Pragmatics, Socioling, Text/Corpus Ling/UK

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Date: Thu, 22 Sep 2016 15:04:36
From: Minna Nevala [minna.nevala at uta.fi]
Subject: Knowing Me and Knowing You: Reference and Identity Markers in Public Discourse

 Full Title: Knowing Me and Knowing You: Reference and Identity Markers in Public Discourse 

Date: 16-Jul-2017 - 21-Jul-2017
Location: Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom 
Contact Person: Minna Nevala
Meeting Email: minna.nevala at uta.fi
Web Site: http://ipra.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.CONFERENCE15&n=1510 

Linguistic Field(s): Discourse Analysis; Historical Linguistics; Pragmatics; Sociolinguistics; Text/Corpus Linguistics 

Call Deadline: 15-Oct-2016 

Meeting Description:

This panel studies the use of labeling in texts intended to be public, as
reflected in their accessibility or distribution in the public domain. It
approaches the importance of reference and identity markers in both synchronic
and diachronic data and investigates their contribution to the construction of
a potentially evaluative stance. The data studied will draw on a variety of
text types and contexts, including newspapers, online media, political
communication, business or legal texts, and therefore allow for a range of
‘real world’ settings to be considered, aligning the focus of this workshop
with the conference’s overall theme.

The public nature of the data allows for self and other reference to be
studied in contexts, where the exact composition of the audience may not be
fully known. Nevertheless, considerations of ratified and unratified
participants (cf. Goffman 1976; Lugo-Ocando 2015) will have affected the
(potentially strategic) use of terms of address and reference and led to the
creation of specific stylistic and pragmatic effects in diverse discourse
situations. By studying these effects, it is the aim of this workshop to
uncover new insights into discourse specific labeling patterns, both from a
historical and present-day perspective, and to discuss their impact on self
and other representation in the construction of identity in public texts.
Social identities and intergroup relations are usually manifested in the
so-called in-group and out-group discourse. Impoliteness, and negative
labeling in particular, entails creating and maintaining negative impressions,
which can be aided or achieved through the use of ‘labels of primary potency’
(Allport 1986). This means that certain characteristics, like male/female or
criminal/law-abiding, carry more perceptual potency than others, and signal
difference from what is considered mainstream (e.g. moral distinctiveness).
While the diachronic dimension of this panel will allow for trends to be
observed in the development of certain reference markers, the synchronic
approach will facilitate the immediate application of findings to enhance our
understanding and use of reference practices in more or less institutionalized
contexts.


Call for Papers: 

Individual proposals for lectures and posters should take the form of a brief
abstract (min. 250 and max. 500 words, not including references and data);
mind the  15 October 2016 deadline. It is the individual submitter’s choice to
submit for oral presentation (lecture) or a poster. For oral presentations,
30-minute slots will be available (including discussion time and time for
moving between sessions). Posters will be up for the whole week; during one of
the conference days, there is a poster period during which all other
conference activities are blocked so that attention goes exclusively to
looking at and discussing posters. IPrA actively encourages the submission of
posters; experience tells us that they often lead to more serious interaction
and result in more lasting and fruitful contacts than oral presentations.

Please submit your abstracts for this panel via the IPrA webpages
http://ipra.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.CONFERENCE15&n=1516. Note that IPrA
membership is required for submitting an abstract (with all deadlines in 2016)
as well as for presenting during the conference (in 2017). The 'contribute'
link for submitting an abstract will not be available until an individual has
become a member in IPrA and logged in at the above website.



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