29.2898, Calls: Anthro Ling, Applied Ling, Pragmatics, Socioling/China

The LINGUIST List linguist at listserv.linguistlist.org
Fri Jul 13 17:32:36 EDT 2018


LINGUIST List: Vol-29-2898. Fri Jul 13 2018. ISSN: 1069 - 4875.

Subject: 29.2898, Calls: Anthro Ling, Applied Ling, Pragmatics, Socioling/China

Moderators: linguist at linguistlist.org (Damir Cavar, Malgorzata E. Cavar)
Reviews: reviews at linguistlist.org (Helen Aristar-Dry, Robert Coté)
Homepage: https://linguistlist.org

Please support the LL editors and operation with a donation at:
           https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/

Editor for this issue: Everett Green <everett at linguistlist.org>
================================================================


Date: Fri, 13 Jul 2018 17:31:41
From: Claire Maree [cmaree at unimelb.edu.au]
Subject: Gender, Employment, Language, Regionality and Class

 
Full Title: Gender, Employment, Language, Regionality and Class 
Short Title: GELRC Transitions 

Date: 09-Jun-2019 - 14-Jun-2019
Location: Hong Kong, China 
Contact Person: Lidia Tanaka
Meeting Email: L.Tanaka at latrobe.edu.au

Linguistic Field(s): Anthropological Linguistics; Applied Linguistics; Pragmatics; Sociolinguistics 

Call Deadline: 15-Oct-2018 

Meeting Description:

Panel Conveners: 

Lidia Tanaka (La Trobe University)
Claire Maree (University of Melbourne)
Ikuko Nakane (University of Melbourne)

The relationship between language and employment, regionality and class has
been widely researched within the UK and North America (e.g. Chambers, 2009;
Labov, 2006). Longitudinal studies suggest a strong correlation between
further education, employment and the adoption of ‘prestigious’ variants. This
indicates that individual speakers demonstrate an understanding of linguistic
capital (see e.g. Chambers, 2009; Bourdieu, 1991) and the intersections of
language and identity (Agha, 2009). Looking in the Asian region, fewer
longitudinal studies explore the intersections of employment, regionality and
class.. Although Japanese dialects have been thoroughly studied (e.g.
Kobayashi & Shinozaki, 2003), little is known about the influence of
employment, or social class, on language use over different life stages.
Notable exceptions are Smith’s (1992) study on the dilemma faced by women
executives when talking to male subordinates, Sunaoshi’s (2004) work on
dialect and standard language use by female farmers, and SturtzStreethran’s
(2006) investigation of Japanese male office-workers and personal pronouns.
Other studies such as Smith-Hefner (2009) on Indonesian and Javanese language,
examine issues of language choice. And work such as Yang (2007, 2010)
investigates the influence of political change on language and gender in
contemporary China.

This panel will focus on research that explores the relationship between
employment, regionality and class in the language of working class women (and
men) who have grown, live and work in regional districts. It seeks to explore
language emerging from the margins of regionality, gender, sexuality and class
in the Asia-Pacific region and/or global south. We encourage presenters
engaged in longitudinal and age-grading studies to reflect critically on these
themes and explore shifts and changes in language style, but also in
interrelationships between dialect and standard language. In doing so, this
panel aims to contribute to generate non-Eurocentric scholarship and engage
with data from the margins. 

References:

Agha, A. (2007). Language and Social Relations. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.
Bourdieu, P. (1991). Language and Symbolic Power. Harvard University Press.
Chambers, J. K. (2009). Sociolinguistic Theory. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell.
Kobayashi, T., and Shinozaki, Koichi (Eds.) (2003). Gaidobukku: Hōgen kenkyū
(A guide book to dialect research). Tokyo: Hizuji Shobo.
Labov, W. (2006). The Social Stratification of English in New York City.
Cambridge University Press.
Smith, J. S. (1992). Women in charge: Politeness and directives in the speech
of Japanese women. Language in Society, 21(1), 59-82.
Smith‐Hefner, N. J. (2009). Language shift, gender, and ideologies of
modernity in Central Java, Indonesia. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology,
19(1), 57-77.
SturtzSreetharan, C. (2004). Japanese men’s linguistic stereotypes and
realities. In S. Okamoto & J. Shibamoto (Eds.), Japanese Language, Gender and
Ideology: Cultural Models and Real People, (pp. 275–289). Oxford: Oxford
University Press.
Sunaoshi, Y. (2004). Farm women’s professional discourse in Ibaraki. In S.
Okamoto & J. (Eds.), Japanese Language, Gender and Ideology: Cultural Models
and Real People (pp. 187-204). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Yang, J. (2007). ‘Re-employment Stars’: Language, Gender and Neoliberal
Restructuring in China. Words, Worlds, and Material Girls: Language, Gender,
Globalization, 77-106.


Call for Papers:

We would like to invite contributions that explore the relationship between
employment, regionality and class in the language of working class women (and
men) who have grown, live and work in regional districts. In particular papers
that engage with language emerging from the margins of regionality, gender,
sexuality and class in the Asia-Pacific region and/or global south. We
encourage presenters engaged in longitudinal and age-grading studies to
reflect critically on these themes and explore shifts and changes in language
style, but also in interrelationships between dialect and standard language. 

Abstracts of 250 - 500 words (including references) can be submitted via the
IPrA conference website https://ipra2019.exordo.com/. 

Additional information regarding the abstract submission process can be found
at http://pragmatics.international/page/CfP




------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*****************    LINGUIST List Support    *****************
Please support the LL editors and operation with a donation at:

              The IU Foundation Crowd Funding site:
       https://iufoundation.fundly.com/the-linguist-list

               The LINGUIST List FundDrive Page:
            https://funddrive.linguistlist.org/donate/
 


----------------------------------------------------------
LINGUIST List: Vol-29-2898	
----------------------------------------------------------





More information about the LINGUIST mailing list