<DIV>Hi Bob,</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#ff4040>-- In the SE there are problems created by notation and also by the Southeastern <BR>areal feature by which some /i/ may be phonetically [e]. Mary Haas's paper on <BR>"The Last Words of Biloxi" points out that [e] is an allophone of the phoneme <BR>/i/.... -</FONT>-  I just recently got and read this article, and I think Haas mentions that for words ending in -i', it often comes out as -e', i think she says when there's silence following.  Or did I misread/miscomprehend that?</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#ff4040>-- Ofo appears to share this trait, and I have a short discussion of it in that <BR>little Ofo pamphlet I prepared for the Siouan Conf. a couple of years back in <BR>Rapid City.--</FONT>  Is there some way I can get my hands on a copy of your article?  Was it published?</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Thanks,</DIV>
<DIV>Dave<BR></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><BR><B><I>"R. Rankin" <rankin@ku.edu></I></B> wrote:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">At least a few of the uN/aN correspondences signal loanwords. The one that <BR>comes to mind is 'squash/pumpkin' with LA wagmu; DA wamna, both from Algonquian <BR>either directly or indirectly.<BR><BR>> In some cases Kaw may have u-umlaut for *i.<BR><BR>These are cases of genuine Umlaut, with *i > u" only if another u" is the next <BR>vowel to the right. Shouldn't happen otherwise except for that peculiar Kaw <BR>benefactive in /gu"/. I assume the mechanism in the latter case is analogical <BR>rather than phonological though.<BR><BR>> There are some cases of *e, *o > i, u in the Crow-Hidatsa and Southeastern<BR>> peripheries, too, I guess.<BR><BR>Yeah, I'm still not entirely clear on just what the correspondences and changes <BR>are with Crow and Hidatsa vs. the rest. Wes had it linked to vowel length.<BR><BR>In the SE there are problems created by notation and!
 also by
 the Southeastern <BR>areal feature by which some /i/ may be phonetically [e]. Mary Haas's paper on <BR>"The Last Words of Biloxi" points out that [e] is an allophone of the phoneme <BR>/i/, whereas the actual phoneme /e/ is always [epsilon]. Unfortunately a lot of <BR>Siouanists have tended to write [e] and [epsilon] with the same phoneme symbol. <BR>Ofo appears to share this trait, and I have a short discussion of it in that <BR>little Ofo pamphlet I prepared for the Siouan Conf. a couple of years back in <BR>Rapid City.<BR><BR>Bob <BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE><p>
                <hr size=1>Do you Yahoo!?<br>
All your favorites on one personal page  <a href="http://my.yahoo.com">Try My Yahoo!</a>