[Ads-l] Another early "the whole six yards" (Georgia, 1922)

Bonnie Taylor-Blake b.taylorblake at GMAIL.COM
Wed Aug 19 20:23:11 EDT 2020


This, from north central Georgia, nicely parallels how "the whole six yards
of it" had been used in Spartanburg, South Carolina just 10 months earlier.
(See link far below for the Spartanburg headline.)

-------------------

Now this is the whole six yards of the baseball game here last Friday --
Norcross-Duluth school boys. Norcross won by 10 to 1, and the main features
of the game were Jordan's pitching and Summerlin's hitting. You'll observe
familiar names among the kids -- Simpson, Carlisle, Martin.

[And then comes the box score for the game.]

(From "Norcross Wins Game from Duluth," The News-Herald [Lawrenceville,
Georgia], 30 March 1922. Via the Georgia Historic Newspapers database at
https://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/.)

-------------------

I share this mostly because it extends the distribution of early uses of
"the whole six yards." The idiom's appearances in Kentucky in 1912-1916, in
Arkansas in 1917, in South Carolina and Georgia in 1921-1922, and in
Missouri in 1927 suggest that folks in extended parts of the Upland South
were all using and understanding "the whole six yards," though infrequently
committing it to newsprint.

-- Bonnie

"The Whole Six Yards of It":
https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=cmMsAAAAIBAJ&sjid=8skEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3787,2164793&dq=whole-six+yards-of-it&hl=en

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