LGPOLICY-LIST digest 325

Lisa Bonnici lmbonnici at ucdavis.edu
Tue Oct 10 23:23:25 UTC 2006


As of yet, there has not been any sociolinguistic studies of language shift
in Malta.  However, Maltese abroad have been found to shift to English
rapidly, and some insights into how language is valued in Malta can be found
in Slavik (1999).  It appears that language fluency is family-based (some
families adopt Maltese as the home language, some English, with high levels
of code-switching in either case).   Codeswitching occurs in basically all
interactions.

Recently, a language planning and policy group (
http://www.letteraturamaltija.com/) was formed in Malta, with the aim of
promoting Maltese language maintenance along with Maltese literature.  From
my conversations with Maltese this summer, there are some negative attitudes
towards the committee; specifically in its invention of Maltese-based
neologisms to supplement and/or replace borrowings.   This is a tricky
case.  English has been on the island since 1800 and Maltese are quick to
point out how the language has survived multiple colonizations.  Maltese
definitely has a great deal of local value.  However, Maltese all recognize
the value of English both within (university exams and courses are almost
entirely carried out in English) and outside of Malta.  In a case study, I
found that bilingualism is still the norm and is viewed as a social and
economic necessity/advantage on the islands.

Lisa Bonnici

On 10/10/06, Multiple recipients of list <lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
wrote:
>
>
>                             LGPOLICY-LIST Digest 325
>
> Topics covered in this issue include:
>
>   1) Re: Malta: Minister launches new book collection on Maltese language
>         by "Stan and Sandy Anonby" < stan-sandy_anonby at sil.org>
>   2) Re: Malta: Minister launches new book collection on Maltese language
>         by Maggie Canvin < sociolingo at yahoo.com>
>   3) Conference: 5th Mercator International Symposium: Linguistic Rights
>         by "Harold F. Schiffman" <haroldfs at ccat.sas.upenn.edu >
>   4) Dubai: contest to recite Koran from memory
>         by "Harold F. Schiffman" <haroldfs at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
>   5) linganth listserv topic
>         by "Harold F. Schiffman" <haroldfs at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
>
>
> Message-ID: <004801c6ec1c$7b94b320$6500a8c0 at anonby01>
> From: "Stan and Sandy Anonby" < stan-sandy_anonby at sil.org>
> To: <lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
> Subject: Re: Malta: Minister launches new book collection on Maltese
> language
> Date: Mon, 9 Oct 2006 20:27:26 -0700
> MIME-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: text/plain;
>         format=flowed;
>         charset="iso-8859-1";
>         reply-type=original
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> Anybody know if the Maltese are shifting to English?
>
> Stan Anonby
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Harold F. Schiffman" <haroldfs at ccat.sas.upenn.edu >
> To: "RELEASED MESSAGE" <joe_spam at sil.org>; "Language Policy-List"
> <lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu >
> Sent: Monday, October 09, 2006 7:58 AM
> Subject: Malta: Minister launches new book collection on Maltese language
>
>
> > Minister launches new book collection on Maltese language for adults
> >
> > by Dorian Cassar, di-ve news
> >
> > FLORIANA, Malta (di-ve news) -- October 07, 2006 -- 1915CEST -- Minister
> > Louis Galea launched a collection of three books, Sisien, aimed at
> > teaching adults how to use the Maltese language appropriately in
> everyday
> > situations. The book collection is the outcome of a pedagogical training
> > programme to 46 literacy facilitators which was co-financed by the EU
> > Structural Funds. The first book in the collection is Nghallmu Lsienna,
> > aimed at serving as a guide for teachers to the way to address adults
> when
> > learning the Maltese language. The second book is Inhaddmu Lsienna which
> > presents themes and discussion topics to aid reading, listening,
> > understanding and speaking.
> >
> > The remaining book is called Nitharrgu fi Lsienna and should serve to
> > strengthen reading skills and to provide guidelines that will help the
> > student to write correctly. "The collection is a direct result of years
> of
> > experience of teaching the Maltese language to adults", Minister Galea
> > told a press conference on Saturday. He added that the basic abilities
> of
> > any language are directly addressed in this project and aims at giving
> > basic training in listening, speaking, reading and writing.
> >
> > When quoting NSO figures, Minister Galea said that 15,437 persons
> followed
> > a literacy course in 2004. The Education Division alone has offered
> > courses to 7,800 individuals in 2005.
> >
> > http://www.di-ve.com/dive/portal/portal.jhtml?id=251698&pid=23
> >
> >
> ***********************************************************************************
> >
> > N.b.: Listing on the lgpolicy-list is merely intended as a service to
> its
> > members
> > and implies neither approval, confirmation nor agreement by the owner or
>
> > sponsor of
> > the list as to the veracity of a message's contents. Members who
> disagree
> > with a
> > message are encouraged to post a rebuttal.
> >
> >
> ***********************************************************************************
>
> >
> > X-Quarantine ID  /var/spool/MD-Quarantine/11/qdir-
> 2006-10-09-11.01.23-001
>
>
> Message-ID: <20061010103528.42838.qmail at web30401.mail.mud.yahoo.com >
> Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2006 03:35:28 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Maggie Canvin <sociolingo at yahoo.com>
> Subject: Re: Malta: Minister launches new book collection on Maltese
> language
> To: lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu
> MIME-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
> boundary="0-294826728-1160476528=:42392"
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> --0-294826728-1160476528=:42392
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> Rather curious question, if anything it would seem the shift is in the
> othe=
> r direction. See today's news from
> Malta:=0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0Ahttp://www=
> .di-ve.com/dive/portal/portal.jhtml?id=3D55006&pid=3D117=0A=0A=0ATheMaltes=
> e Language set to=0Abecome an official language in the EU =0A=0A=0Aby
> Edito=
> r=0Adi-ve.com =0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0AThe Government of Malta said that
> =
> a European Union=0ACOREPER meeting approved a recommendation by the
> Europea=
> n Commission to the=0Aeffect of assuring a place for the Maltese Language
> a=
> mong the official=0Alanguages of the EU. =0A=0A=0A=0AAmongst other things
> t=
> his means that the EU will start issuing all the laws and=0Athe official
> do=
> cuments in the Maltese language, while the Maltese=0Arepresentative in the
> =
> European Parliament would be able to deliver their=0Aspeeches in Maltese,?
> =
> the Government said. =0A=0A=0A=0AThe Government went on to say that this
> de=
> cision will also mean that Maltese=0Acitizens would be able to write to
> the=
> European Commission and other=0Ainstitutions in Maltese and receive their
> =
> replies with the same language. =0A=0A=0A=0AAt present, the EU embraces 11
> =
> official languages (Danish, Finnish, French,=0AGerman, Greek, English,
> Dutc=
> h, Swedish, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese). Two=0Aof these languages ?
> En=
> glish and French, are considered as working languages by=0Athe European
> Com=
> mission.=0A=0A=0A =0A=0A=0A
> =0A=0A=0Ahttp://www.maltatoday.com.mt/2002/0512=
> /t1.html=0A=0A=0AIf this is not news, then what is? Maltese is to be an
> off=
> icial European=0AUnion language. The news is being greeted with gleeful
> pat=
> riotism from the=0AMaltese side, but not without a touch of caution at the
> =
> wide possibilities this=0Aopens up both in terms of language development
> an=
> d employment opportunities for=0Athe Maltese. Strangely, government has
> kep=
> t the news as low key as is possible.=0A=0A=0AThe move will mean that
> Malte=
> se will be used as a working language when=0AMaltese functionaries talk in
> =
> European Union seminars. It will also lead to the=0Aimmediate employment
> of=
> up to 180 Maltese proficient in writing and speaking=0AMaltese in
> Brussels=
> =0Aon accession.=0A=0A=0AFurthermore, it will add a new dimension to the
> Ma=
> ltese language. The=0Adecision to include Maltese as an official language
> i=
> s a feat for the=0Anegotiating team. More so, when one considers that
> other=
> European languages=0Asuch as Catalan, Basque, Breton and Gaelic are not
> co=
> nsidered as official=0Alanguages. =0A=0A=0A =0A=0A=0A=0A=0A----- Original
> M=
> essage ----=0AFrom: Stan and Sandy Anonby < stan-sandy_anonby at sil.org
> >=0ATo:=
> lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu=0ASent: Tuesday, 10 October, 2006
> 3:27:26=
> AM=0ASubject: Re: Malta: Minister launches new book collection on Maltese
> =
> language=0A=0AAnybody know if the Maltese are shifting to
> English?=0A=0ASta=
> n Anonby=0A=0A----- Original Message ----- =0AFrom: "Harold F. Schiffman"
> <=
> haroldfs at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>=0ATo: "RELEASED MESSAGE" < joe_spam at sil.org>;
> "=
> Language Policy-List" =0A<lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>=0ASent:
> Monday,=
> October 09, 2006 7:58 AM=0ASubject: Malta: Minister launches new book
> coll=
> ection on Maltese language=0A=0A=0A> Minister launches new book collection
> =
> on Maltese language for adults=0A>=0A> by Dorian Cassar, di-ve
> news=0A>=0A>=
> FLORIANA, Malta (di-ve news) -- October 07, 2006 -- 1915CEST -- Minister=
> =0A> Louis Galea launched a collection of three books, Sisien, aimed
> at=0A>=
> teaching adults how to use the Maltese language appropriately in everyday=
> =0A> situations. The book collection is the outcome of a pedagogical
> traini=
> ng=0A> programme to 46 literacy facilitators which was co-financed by the
> E=
> U=0A> Structural Funds. The first book in the collection is Nghallmu
> Lsienn=
> a,=0A> aimed at serving as a guide for teachers to the way to address
> adult=
> s when=0A> learning the Maltese language. The second book is Inhaddmu
> Lsien=
> na which=0A> presents themes and discussion topics to aid reading,
> listenin=
> g,=0A> understanding and speaking.=0A>=0A> The remaining book is called
> Nit=
> harrgu fi Lsienna and should serve to=0A> strengthen reading skills and to
> =
> provide guidelines that will help the=0A> student to write correctly. "The
> =
> collection is a direct result of years of=0A> experience of teaching the
> Ma=
> ltese language to adults", Minister Galea=0A> told a press conference on
> Sa=
> turday. He added that the basic abilities of=0A> any language are directly
> =
> addressed in this project and aims at giving=0A> basic training in
> listenin=
> g, speaking, reading and writing.=0A>=0A> When quoting NSO figures,
> Ministe=
> r Galea said that 15,437 persons followed=0A> a literacy course in 2004.
> Th=
> e Education Division alone has offered=0A> courses to 7,800 individuals in
> =
> 2005.=0A>=0A>
> http://www.di-ve.com/dive/portal/portal.jhtml?id=3D251698&pid=
> =3D23=0A>=0A>
> *************************************************************=
> **********************=0A>=0A> N.b.: Listing on the lgpolicy-list is
> merely=
> intended as a service to its =0A> members=0A> and implies neither
> approval=
> , confirmation nor agreement by the owner or =0A> sponsor of=0A> the list
> a=
> s to the veracity of a message's contents. Members who disagree =0A> with
> a=
> =0A> message are encouraged to post a rebuttal.=0A>=0A>
> *******************=
> ****************************************************************=0A>=0A>
> X-=
> Quarantine ID  /var/spool/MD-Quarantine/11/qdir-2006-10-09-11.01.23-001=0A=
>
> =0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=0A=09=09=0A__________________________________________=
> _________________ =0AAll New Yahoo! Mail =96 Tired of Vi at gr @! come-ons?
> Let=
> our SpamGuard protect you. http://uk.docs.yahoo.com/nowyoucan.html
> --0-294826728-1160476528=:42392
> Content-Type: text/html; charset=ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> <html><head><style type=3D"text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;}
> --></style></he=
> ad><body><div style=3D"font-family:verdana, helvetica,
> sans-serif;font-size=
> :12pt"><div style=3D"font-family: verdana,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size:
> =
> 12pt;">Rather curious question, if anything it would seem the shift is in
> t=
> he other direction. See today's news from Malta:<br>=0A=0A<p
> class=3D"MsoNo=
> rmal" style=3D""><span class=3D"MsoHyperlink"><span
> style=3D""><br></span><=
> /span></p><p>=0A=0A</p><p class=3D"MsoNormal" style=3D""><span
> class=3D"Mso=
> Hyperlink"><span style=3D""><a href=3D"
> http://www.di-ve.com/dive/portal/por=
> tal.jhtml?id=3D55006&pid=3D117">http://www.di-ve.com/dive/portal/portal=
> .jhtml?id=3D55006&pid=3D117</a><o:p></o:p></span></span></p>=0A=0A<p
> cl=
> ass=3D"MsoNormal" style=3D""><b><span style=3D"font-size: 14pt;
> font-family=
> : "Times New Roman";">The Maltese Language set to=0Abecome an
> off=
> icial language in the EU <o:p></o:p></span></b></p>=0A=0A<p
> class=3D"MsoNor=
> mal" style=3D"margin-top: 0cm;"><span style=3D"font-size: 14pt;
> font-family=
> : "Times New Roman";">by <i>Editor=0Adi-ve.com</i><br>=0A</span>=
> <span style=3D"font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New
> Roman";">=
> <br style=3D"">=0A<!--[if !supportLineBreakNewLine]--><br
> style=3D"">=0A<!-=
> -[endif]--><o:p></o:p></span></p>=0A=0A<p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span style=
>
> =3D"font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman";">The
> Governm=
> ent of Malta said that a European Union=0ACOREPER meeting approved a
> recomm=
> endation by the European Commission to the=0Aeffect of assuring a place
> for=
> the Maltese Language among the official=0Alanguages of the EU.
> <br>=0A<br>=
> =0AAmongst other things this means that the EU will start issuing all the
> l=
> aws and=0Athe official documents in the Maltese language, while the
> Maltese=
> =0Arepresentative in the European Parliament would be able to deliver
> their=
> =0Aspeeches in Maltese,? the Government said. <br>=0A<br>=0AThe Government
> =
> went on to say that this decision will also mean that Maltese=0Acitizens
> wo=
> uld be able to write to the European Commission and other=0Ainstitutions
> in=
> Maltese and receive their replies with the same language.
> <br>=0A<br>=0AAt=
> present, the EU embraces 11 official languages (Danish, Finnish, French,=
> =0AGerman, Greek, English, Dutch, Swedish, Italian, Spanish and
> Portuguese)=
> . Two=0Aof these languages ? English and French, are considered as working
> =
> languages by=0Athe European Commission.</span></p>=0A=0A<p
> class=3D"MsoNorm=
> al"><o:p> </o:p></p>=0A=0A<p
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>=
> =0A=0A<p class=3D"MsoNormal"><a href=3D"http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/2002/0=
> 512/t1.html">http://www.maltatoday.com.mt/2002/0512/t1.html
> </a></p>=0A=0A<p=
> >If this is not news, then what is? Maltese is to be an official European=
>
> =0AUnion language. The news is being greeted with gleeful patriotism from
> t=
> he=0AMaltese side, but not without a touch of caution at the wide
> possibili=
> ties this=0Aopens up both in terms of language development and employment
> o=
> pportunities for=0Athe Maltese. Strangely, government has kept the news as
> =
> low key as is possible.<o:p></o:p></p>=0A=0A<p>The move will mean that
> Malt=
> ese will be used as a working language when=0AMaltese functionaries talk
> in=
> European Union seminars. It will also lead to the=0Aimmediate employment
> o=
> f up to 180 Maltese proficient in writing and speaking=0AMaltese in
> <st1:Ci=
> ty w:st=3D"on"><st1:place w:st=3D"on">Brussels</st1:place></st1:City>=0Aon
> =
> accession.<o:p></o:p></p>=0A=0A<p>Furthermore, it will add a new dimension
> =
> to the Maltese language. The=0Adecision to include Maltese as an official
> l=
> anguage is a feat for the=0Anegotiating team. More so, when one considers
> t=
> hat other European languages=0Asuch as Catalan, Basque, Breton and Gaelic
> a=
> re not considered as official=0Alanguages.
> <o:p></o:p></p>=0A=0A<p> <o=
> :p></o:p></p>=0A=0A<br><br><div style=3D"font-family: times new roman,new
> y=
> ork,times,serif; font-size: 12pt;">----- Original Message ----<br>From:
> Sta=
> n and Sandy Anonby <stan-sandy_anonby at sil.org><br>To:
> lgpolicy-list at c=
> cat.sas.upenn.edu<br>Sent: Tuesday, 10 October, 2006 3:27:26
> AM<br>Subject:=
> Re: Malta: Minister launches new book collection on Maltese
> language<br><b=
> r><div>Anybody know if the Maltese are shifting to English?<br><br>Stan
> Ano=
> nby<br><br>----- Original Message ----- <br>From: "Harold F. Schiffman"
> &lt=
> ;haroldfs at ccat.sas.upenn.edu><br>To: "RELEASED MESSAGE"
> <joe_spam at sil=
> .org>; "Language Policy-List" <br><lgpolicy- list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu
> &g=
> t;<br>Sent: Monday, October 09, 2006 7:58 AM<br>Subject: Malta: Minister
> la=
> unches new book collection on Maltese language<br><br><br>> Minister
> lau=
> nches new book collection on Maltese language for adults<br>><br>>
> by=
> Dorian Cassar, di-ve news<br>><br>> FLORIANA, Malta (di-ve news) --
> =
> October 07, 2006 -- 1915CEST --
> Minister<br>> Louis Galea launched a collection of three books,
> Sisien,=
> aimed at<br>> teaching adults how to use the Maltese language
> appropria=
> tely in everyday<br>> situations. The book collection is the outcome of
> =
> a pedagogical training<br>> programme to 46 literacy facilitators which
> =
> was co-financed by the EU<br>> Structural Funds. The first book in the
> c=
> ollection is Nghallmu Lsienna,<br>> aimed at serving as a guide for
> teac=
> hers to the way to address adults when<br>> learning the Maltese
> languag=
> e. The second book is Inhaddmu Lsienna which<br>> presents themes and
> di=
> scussion topics to aid reading, listening,<br>> understanding and
> speaki=
> ng.<br>><br>> The remaining book is called Nitharrgu fi Lsienna and
> s=
> hould serve to<br>> strengthen reading skills and to provide guidelines
> =
> that will help the<br>> student to write correctly. "The collection is
> a=
> direct result of years of<br>> experience of teaching the Maltese
> langu=
> age to
> adults", Minister Galea<br>> told a press conference on Saturday. He
> ad=
> ded that the basic abilities of<br>> any language are directly
> addressed=
> in this project and aims at giving<br>> basic training in listening,
> sp=
> eaking, reading and writing.<br>><br>> When quoting NSO figures,
> Mini=
> ster Galea said that 15,437 persons followed<br>> a literacy course in
> 2=
> 004. The Education Division alone has offered<br>> courses to 7,800
> indi=
> viduals in 2005.<br>><br>> <a target=3D"_blank" href=3D"http://www.di=
>
> -ve.com/dive/portal/portal.jhtml?id=3D251698&pid=3D23<http://ve.com/dive/portal/portal.jhtml?id=3D251698&pid=3D23>
> ">http://www.di-ve=
> .com/dive/portal/portal.jhtml?id=3D251698&pid=3D23</a><br>><br>>
> =
>
> ***************************************************************************=
> ********<br>><br>> N.b.: Listing on the lgpolicy-list is merely
> inten=
> ded as a service to its <br>> members<br>> and implies neither
> approv=
> al, confirmation nor agreement by the owner or <br>> sponsor of<br>>
> =
> the list as to the
> veracity of a message's contents. Members who disagree <br>> with
> a<br>=
> > message are encouraged to post a rebuttal.<br>><br>>
> ***********=
>
> ************************************************************************<br=
> >><br>> X-Quarantine
> ID  /var/spool/MD-Quarantine/11/qdir-2=
> 006-10-09-11.01.23-001<br><br></div></div><br></div></div><br>=0A=09=09<hr=
> size=3D1> =0A<a href=3D"http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail/uk/taglines/default/no=
> wyoucan/pc_mag/*
> http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=3D40565/*http://uk.docs.yahoo.co=
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>
>
> Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2006 09:45:29 -0400 (EDT)
> From: "Harold F. Schiffman" < haroldfs at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
> To: Language Policy-List <lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
> Subject: Conference: 5th Mercator International Symposium: Linguistic
> Rights
> Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.58.0610100943310.623 at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
> MIME-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
>
> 5th Mercator International Symposium: Linguistic Rights as a Social
> Inclusion Factor
>
> Date: 19-Oct-2006 - 21-Oct-2006
> Location: Barcelona (Catalonia), Spain
> Contact: Oriol Ampuero
> Meeting URL: http://www.ciemen.org/mercator/Menu_nou/index.cfm?lg=gb
>
>
> V Mercator Internacional Symposium on Minority Languages
>
> Linguistic Rights as a Social Inclusion Factor
> 19 - 21 October 2006
> Institut d'Estudis Catalans (IEC), Barcelona
> Organizer: Mercator-Legislation, CIEMEN (Barcelona, Catalonia)
>
> Presentation
>
> Overview Europe has always been a multilingual land. This fact has been
> accentuated in recent decades by the steady arrival and settlement on the
> continent by non-Europeans who have brought their languages with them. The
> current linguistic reality in Europe is, therefore, richer and more
> complex than ever. The European Union -a political, economic and cultural
> work in progress which has as one of its goals to put into practice the
> democratic principle of uniting Europeans in respect for diversity- lives
> fully immersed in this reality. In the process of its construction, the
> European Union has to address issues as important as those related to
> immigration and the social inclusion of immigrants from other continents,
> who represent in many areas a significant percentage of the total
> population.
>
> The languages spoken in the European Union today -those traditionally
> considered European and those brought with immigration- are one of the
> keys to making possible such 'union in diversity' of all citizens, groups,
>
> communities, and peoples that live together in Europe. To encourage such
> harmony, we must ask ourselves which kind of multilingualism should the
> European Union put into practice now and in the future. At the same time,
> it raises the question of how the linguistic rights of immigrants and of
> receiving communities can be regulated and guaranteed and, more
> specifically, how the exercise of these rights could stimulate the social
> inclusion of newcomers who settle among minoritized linguistic communities
> that share their space with majority or dominant languages.
>
> Symposium The V Mercator International Symposium will critically analyse
> the issues under consideration, taking as an indispensable departure point
> the respect for the rights of everyone, and will emphasize the role of
> language as a factor of inclusion in European Union societies with
> minoritized languages.  The Symposium will also present a series of
> practice cases for balancing individual rights and the collective rights
> of speakers of both the languages of immigration and the minoritized
> languages within the European Union. Moreover, it intends to gather
> proposals that encourage the social cohesion of the receiving communities
> while consolidating, at the same time, non-discriminatory linguistic
> diversity. In such proposals, emphasis will be placed on the legislative
> aspects that may contribute to the advancement of linguistic rights.
>
> Thursday, 19 (AFTERNOON)
>
> 2:30 pm
> Registration & accreditation
>
> Opening
>
> 3:30 pm
> Welcome
> Aureli Argem, President of CIEMEN & Director of Mercator Linguistic Rights
>
> and Legislation
>
> Representative of the Government of Catalonia
>
> Jacques Delmoly, Head of Unit, Multilingualism Policy, Directorate General
> for Education and Culture, European Commission
>
> 4:15 pm
> Coffee Break
>
> Opening Session
>
> 4:30 pm
> Lecture
> Immigrants, National Minorities, and Language Rights: Towards an
> Acceptable Normative Theory
> Alan Patten, Princeton University, New Jersey, USA
> Chaired by: Isidor Mar, Open University of Catalonia (UOC)
>
> 5:15 pm
> Question time
>
> 5:30 pm
> Lecture
> A European Approach. Language, Nation, Immigration and Citizenship:
> Processes of Change, Political Innovation and Social Inclusion
> Ricard Zapata, Pompeu Fabra University, Catalonia
> Chaired by: Xavier Aragall, European Institute of the Mediterranean
> (IEMed)
>
> 6:00 pm
> Question time
>
> 6:15 pm
> LECTURE
> Linguistic Policy in the EU: Discourses of Inclusion/Exclusion
> Mirad Nic Craith University of Ulster, Northen Ireland
> Chaired by: Agust Colomines, LINGUAPAX
>
> 6:45-7:00 pm
> Question time
>
> FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 (MORNING)
> THEME I: LEGISLATION
>
> Chaired by: Bernat Joan i Mar, Member of the European Parliament for
> Esquerra Republicana de Catalunya, Greens/ EFA Group
>
> 9:00 am
> LECTURE
> Can Laws Change Realities? Some Thoughts on the Basis of the Experience
> Under the Framework Convention on National Minorities
> Sia Spiliopoulou kermark, Uppsala University
>
> 9:30 am
> Question time
>
> 9:45 am
> Case Study I:
> The European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages as a Instrument
> for Social Cohesion: The Case of Immigration in Catalonia
> Santi J. Castell, Rovira Virgili University, Catalonia
>
> 10:00 am
> Case Study II:
> Immigration and Language Diversity: New Challenges for Human Rights
> Eduardo J. Ruiz Vieytez, Pedro Arrupe Institut of Human Rights, Deusto
> University de Deusto, Basque Country
>
> 10:15 am
> Question time
>
> 10:30 am
> COFFEE BREAK
>
> THEME II: EDUCATION
>
> Chaired by: Durk Gorter, Mercator Education, Friesland
>
> 11:00 am
> LECTURE
> Social Cohesion and Linguistic Rights: National Minority Languages,
> Immigration Languages and State Languages
> Kutlay Yagmur and Guus Extra, Tilburg University, Netherlands
>
> 12:00 am
> Question time
>
> 12:15 am
> Case study I:
> The Multilingual Cities Project - Gteborg, Sweden, one of six EU cities
> Lilian Nygren, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
>
> 12:30 am
> Case study II:
> The Normalisation of Basque in a Diverse Context. Educational Guide of the
> Sakana Region. The immersion in Basque, the Best Option
> Mikel Galartza, member of the Basque Language Board in the County Council
> of Sakana, Navarre
>
> 12:45 pm
> Question time
>
> 13:00-15:00 pm
> LUNCH
>
> FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 (AFTERNOON)
> THEME III: ECONOMY, EMPLOYMENT & TRADE
>
> Chaired by: Carles Bertran, Center Association for the Orientation,
> Training and Insertion for Foreign Workers (CITE - CONC), Catalonia
>
> 3.00 pm
> LECTURE
> The value of non-dominant languages
> Franois Grin, University of Geneva, Switzerland
>
> 3:30 pm
> Question time
>
> 3:45 pm
> Case Study I:
> Linguistic Rights of the Romany in Slovakia as a Constitutional and Policy
> Challenge
> Michal Vaecka, Masaryk University, Czech Republic
>
> 4:00 pm
> Case study II:
> Minority Language and Integration Issues in Latvia and The Baltic States
> Andrejs Veisbergs, University of Latvia, Latvia
>
> 4:15 pm
> Question time
>
> 4:30 pm
> COFFEE BREAK
>
> THEME IV: LEISURE, SPORTS, CULTURE & MEDIA
>
> Chaired by: Elin Haf, Mercator Media, Wales
>
> 5:00 pm
> LECTURE
> Models of Social and Linguistic Cohesion Through Cultural and Leisure
> Activities
> Steve Morris, University of Wales, Swansea, Wales
>
> 5:30 pm
> Question time
>
> 5:45 pm
> Case study I:
> Language Learning and Integration Activities. An Example of Linguistic
> Welcoming
> Jordi Font Anton, Consortium for the Language Normalisation (CpNL),
> Catalonia
>
> 6:00 pm
> Case study II:
> ''Quedem?'' Leisure, Language and Social Cohesion in Catalonia
> Eunice Romero, mnium Cultural, Catalonia
>
> 6:15 pm
> Case study III:
> Radio Svobodni, Free Radio Agora as a Bridge Between Cultures
> Angelika Hdl, Radio Agora, Carinthia
>
> 6:30-6:45 pm
> Question time
>
> SATURDAY, 21 (MORNING)
> HEALTH CARE
>
> Chaired by: Carme Oller, General Directorate of Planning and Evaluation,
> Department of Health of the Generalitat of Catalonia
>
> 9:00 am
> Language Barriers and Acces Difficulties in the Health Services
> Tona Lizana, Action Plan on Immigration, General Directorate of Planning
> and Evaluation, Department of Health of the Generalitat of Catalonia
>
> 9:30 am
> Question time
>
> 9:45 am
> Case Study I:
> Health, Newcomers and Language Barriers
> Sid Ahmed Baba, Association Health and Family, Barcelona, Catalonia
> Tai Mooi Ho Wong, Nephrology Service, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona,
> Catalonia
>
> 10:05 am
> Case Study II:
> Health Care in the Own Language
> Jacob Als Thomsen, Copenhagen University, Denmark
>
> 10:20 am
> Question time
>
> 10:35 am
> COFFEE BREAK
>
> CLOSING SESSION
>
> 11:00 am
> Summary & Conclusions
> Chaired by: Maite Puigdevall, Co-ordinator of Mercator Linguistic Rights
> and Legislation
> Rapporteur: Colin H. Williams. Cardiff University, Wales
>
> 12:30 pm
> Farewell Speeches
> Aureli Argem, President of CIEMEN & Director of Mercator Linguistic Rights
> and Legislation, Catalonia
> Antoni Mir, Director of Linguamn - House of Languages, Catalonia
>
> 13:00 pm
> End of Symposium
>
> Registration
>
> Attendance at the Symposium is free of charge. If you wish to register,
> fill up the registration form (Catalan, English, Spanish).
>
> Information on Hotels in Barcelona: In this document (Word format) you
> will information on hotels in Barcelona and other useful web links.
>
> Organisation
>
> Escarre International Centre For Ethnic Minorities and Nations (CIEMEN) -
> Mercator Programme
> With the sponsoring of: The European Commission and Linguamn - The House
> of Languages
>
> Symposium's Venue
> Prat de la Riba's Room
> Institut d'Estudis Catalans
> C/ del Carme, 47
> 08001 - Barcelona
>
> http://linguistlist.org/issues/17/17-2953.html
>
>
> ***********************************************************************************
>
> N.b.: Listing on the lgpolicy-list is merely intended as a service to its
> members
> and implies neither approval, confirmation nor agreement by the owner or
> sponsor of
> the list as to the veracity of a message's contents. Members who disagree
> with a
> message are encouraged to post a rebuttal.
>
> ***********************************************************************************
>
>
>
> Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2006 13:29:46 -0400 (EDT)
> From: "Harold F. Schiffman" <haroldfs at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
> To: Language Policy-List < lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
> Subject: Dubai: contest to recite Koran from memory
> Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.58.0610101328370.11157 at ccat.sas.upenn.edu >
> MIME-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
>
> Forwarded from the NYTimes, Oct. 10, 2006
>
> DUBAI, United Arab Emirates, Oct. 8  With its big-budget sets, promise of
> large cash prizes and surly judges who grimace at the slightest slip-up,
> the contest might seem like yet another made-for-TV talent show.
>
> But the competition being beamed by satellite across the Muslim world this
> Ramadan is no American Idol. The winners, judged the best at reciting the
> Koran from memory, wont become the objects of breathless gossip in glossy
> magazines. Instead, they will become stars of a different sort, earning
> the respect of devout Muslims and invitations to recite the text during
> religious gatherings.
>
> The competition, the Dubai International Holy Koran Award, is open to
> males aged 21 and younger, and this year more than 80 young Muslim boys
> and men faced off in more than two weeks of nightly performances that end
> Tuesday. The contestants came from around the world to represent their
> countries, including Iran, Iraq, Brazil, Australia and the United States.
>
> Dubais ruler, Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum, sponsors the
> competition, one of the most prestigious Koran recitation contests in the
> world, to encourage young Muslims to understand the essence of their
> faith. He provides the equivalent of nearly $700,000 in prize money,
> including a top prize of almost $70,000.
>
> The contest, in its 10th year, is one befitting a place like Dubai, with
> its penchant for glitz and glamour. Dubai marketers have plastered the
> city with ads that push it as must-see TV, and it is popular enough that
> the awards ceremony attracts dignitaries and prominent personalities.
>
> The scene inside the competition hall is reminiscent of classic American
> spelling bees. The young contestants, primed from years of study, squirm
> in their seats while the audience sits in hushed anxiety.
>
> This is the Olympics of Koran reading, said Ahmad al Suwiedi, head of the
> competitions organizing committee. So whoever goes up there on that stage
> has to make us and his country proud.
>
> Late Thursday night, 10-year-old Khubaib Muhammad walked on stage in his
> tennis shoes and traditional Kenyan dress, sat in an oversize chair that
> engulfed his slight frame and prepared for his chance at fame and fortune.
>
>
> Khubaib has spent hours each day for the past three years memorizing the
> Koran. He competed in local reading competitions in his native Nairobi to
> qualify for this contest. It was hard work, but ultimately it was worth it
>
> because I got here, he said just before taking the stage. Im not nervous.
> Im ready and prepared.
>
> Being prepared means being ready to recite the Koran in Arabic  starting
> anywhere the judges want and for as long as they want. The judges choose
> the section at random, recite the beginning, then expect the contestant to
> pick up where they left off. The contestants must know the text well
> enough to quickly recognize the section the judge is reading.
>
> After Khubaib took the stage, one of the five judges began reciting text.
> At the judges signal, Khubaib took over, his high-pitched voice filling
> the crowded recital hall.
>
> For the next 15 minutes, the boy carried on the recitation by heart, his
> eyes closed in deep concentration, his legs swinging several inches off
> the ground. At one point, one of the judges rang the bell, indicating
> Khubaib had made a mistake. For a moment, the boy was silent, but he
> quickly corrected himself and continued.
>
> To Muslims, the Koran is the word of God as revealed to the Prophet
> Muhammad. In the contest, it is supposed to be read in a melodic chant
> that follows rules known as tajweed, which dictate what letters should be
> emphasized, slurred or silent. The best reciters are legendary, their
> tapes sold across the Muslim world.
>
> This years Dubai champion will ostensibly join their ranks someday.
>
> During a reporters visit last week, the young men exhibited a camaraderie
> built around faith, leaving the problems of the region outside the
> performance hall. This is a positive thing happening in a difficult world,
> said Ahmad Nasser Rabbah, 15, a third-generation Brazilian.
>
> The contestants are judged first on their accuracy to the text, then on
> the quality of their reading according to the rules of tajweed, and
> finally on the quality of their voices. Some of the readers, including
> Khubaib, do not speak Arabic, but have memorized the text by rote.
>
> Ahmed Khorshid, 15, who represents the United States, was impressed by his
> competitors skill level. Ahmed, who lives in Oak Lawn, Ill., said that he
> initially balked when he was invited to Dubai; he did not want to miss out
>
> on his football games. But he decided to give up his position as running
> back at his schools homecoming game to come.
>
> All my friends and sheiks will be watching me on TV back home, and I
> intend to make them proud, he said.
>
> By Friday, it had become increasingly obvious who the likely winners would
> be, with the contestants from Nigeria and Saudi Arabia leading the pack. I
> was really nervous as I walked up to the stage, but as soon as I sat down
> all the fear was gone, said Mohammed Lawa Muhammed, 20, the Nigerian
> contestant.
>
> For all the dreams of scholarly fame, few of the contestants said they
> will seek a life as a cleric. Mr. Muhammed aspires to be a doctor. Ahmed
> Khorshid, the American, wants to be a basketball player.
>
> Khubaib Muhammad, the Kenyan, hopes to be a pilot for the Red Cross. I
> would like to win, he said. It would be a blessing from God.
>
> http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/10/world/middleeast/10koran.html
>
>
> ***********************************************************************************
>
> N.b.: Listing on the lgpolicy-list is merely intended as a service to its
> members
> and implies neither approval, confirmation nor agreement by the owner or
> sponsor of
> the list as to the veracity of a message's contents. Members who disagree
> with a
> message are encouraged to post a rebuttal.
>
>
> ***********************************************************************************
>
>
> Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2006 14:38:05 -0400 (EDT)
> From: "Harold F. Schiffman" < haroldfs at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
> To: Language Policy-List <lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
> Subject: linganth listserv topic
> Message-ID: < Pine.GSO.4.58.0610101434510.21434 at ccat.sas.upenn.edu>
> MIME-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
>
> All:
>
> lgpolicy-listserv members may be interested in an ongoing discussion about
>
> stable bilingualism on the linganth listserv.  You can access the archive
> by going to LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG. and scrolling down to "linganth"
> (linguistic anthropology).  There are a number of messages, some of which
> might benefit from some of the expertise on our list.
>
> The most recent message was this one:
>
> From:         Alexandre Enkerli <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject:      Stable Bilingualism and Multilingualism in Canada (was:
>               Endangered languages)
>
> Glad to see such an interesting discussion about language diversity.
> My two (Canadian) cents, to keep the ball rolling. (I'm sending those
> comments as a French-speaking linguistic anthropologist from Montreal
> who is *not* a specialist of Canada.)
>
> Bilingualism in Canada is quite specific. Unless otherwise specified,
> the term "bilingual" refers to *individuals* who are fluent in both
> French and English. There is a perceived imbalance in the degree of
> "bilingualism" among French- and English-speakers. Bilingualism in
> other languages tends to be treated separately. Fluency is evaluated
> using many criteria, including "accent" and even eloquence.
> English and French are the (only) two official languages in Canada.
> Official status for both languages has important consequences in
> federal politics and administration. Given the official status of both
> languages, bilingualism often implies advantages in professional
> placement. New Brunswick is the only province to be officially
> bilingual (it has the largest French-speaking population outside of
> Quebec); Quebec is officially French-speaking (with important
> political consequences); other provinces are officially
> English-speaking; territories follow federal regulations, though
> Inuktitut/Inuinnaqtun has official status in Nunavut (not sure on the
> details).
> Functional bilingualism can be said to be fairly stable in some
> specific regions. However, the situation in most French-speaking
> communities outside of Quebec is usually perceived as a potential
> switch from French to English: children of "inter-marriages" are
> likely to only speak English. This switch is perceived, in
> French-speaking communities, as tantamount to language loss. Language
> insecurity is at rather high levels in many French-speaking
> communities outside of Quebec.
> In Quebec, the perceived likelihood that French would disappear has
> decreased dramatically over the past several years. In such a
> situation, bilingualism is infrequently perceived as a threat.
> French-speaking Quebeckers appear quite secure in their (our) language
> use and they (we) will often use English in multi-lingual situations,
> without any fear of language, status, or identity loss. Perhaps
> because of French language ideology, English-speakers fluent in French
> tend not to speak French with native speakers of the language (outside
> of formal contexts in which bilingualism might be expected).
> In short, the general model is one of monolingual communities (either
> French- or English-speaking) with bilingual individuals.
>
> Multilingualism is often seen as a completely separate issue. Apart
> from the status of the French language here, multilingualism in Canada
> seems fairly comparable to multilingualism in the U.S., despite
> significant differences in policies and in perceptions. A simplistic
> explanation of differences: for a relatively long time, Canadian
> policies have tended to emphasize the right for immigrant groups to
> "maintain their cultural identities," including their native languages
> (the "mosaic" model instead of the "melting pot"); several languages
> besides English and Spanish are involved in social and political
> issues; multilingualism is probably more of an urban phenomenon
> throughout Canada (most of the Canadian population is concentrated in
> a relatively small number of cities); languages of First
> Nations/aboriginal/Native/autochtonous groups are the object of some
> concern but relatively little attention is paid to those issues by the
> general population.
> Regardless of these issues, the three-generation pattern is perceived
> as the dominant one throughout Canada, with relatively few exceptions.
> Stable bilingualism in, say, Punjabi and English or Italian and French
> is usually limited to specific neighborhoods in one of Canada's
> largest cities.
>
> To briefly go back to the original article which sparked this
> discussion, language diversity in Canada is probably increasing but
> the notion that this diversity might threaten English is rather
> uncommon. One of the reasons might be that functional bilingualism is
> perceived favourably by many people.
> **************************************************************************
>
> H. Schiffman
>
>
>
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