[lg policy] dialect vs vernacular discussion , a reflection !

mostari hind hmostari at YAHOO.COM
Wed Apr 27 18:09:18 UTC 2011


Hi every body , 
Thank you Annette  for your comments  , I invite other scholars to send their reflections on Dialect vs vernacular debate .
 
 
Waiting Annette and Me , for your comments 
 
alll the best 
Dr Mostari 
--- On Tue, 4/26/11, Annette Islei <annetteislei at gmail.com> wrote:


From: Annette Islei <annetteislei at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [lg policy] dialect vs vernacular discussion , a reflection !
To: "Language Policy List" <lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>
Date: Tuesday, April 26, 2011, 10:48 PM


Hi - and I am very interested in linguistic definition and differentiation, to compare with actual uses of these words in context.

In Uganda using or speaking 'in the vernacular' seems to be the standard way to referring to using indigenous home languages, rather than English. To my ears this word in this context has something of a colonial, somewhat derogatory taint to it. However, I am not at all sure whether Ugandans share those connotations. Rosemary Wildsmith in SA has explored possible meanings  of the term 'mother tongue' with her students when beginning to teach Applied Linguistics (?) through an indigenous language in Higher Education, and looking for appropriate translations.

On the other hand, dialect (with reference to indigenous varieties of indigenous languages), is hardly used at all - which may be because the word 'dialect' is not in common use, and/or that due to the possible cultural and political importance of having your 'language' recognsed by the government (the newly introduced multilingual education in Primary schools is probably a factor in raising awareness) people prefer to use the word 'language' for their variety, rather than dialect. As I read recently - although langauges are dying out, the number of languages is increasing as people claim 'linguistic rights'. These are some knock-on social effects which I wonder whether linguists and educationists have anticipated.

This all seems to be potentially very relevant to introducing mother tongue-based multilingual education, and understanding people's perceptions and attitudes - which may assist or hinder it - and the effects on the language ecology

Annette




On 23 April 2011 19:19, mostari hind <hmostari at yahoo.com> wrote:






Hi everybody , 
so far , the dialect - vernacular dicsussion led to two main differntiations :
 
1- In Sterwart's view , dialects lack standarization and autonomy while vernaculars lack only standardization.
 
2- In more recent papers , dialects are said to be possbly written unlike vernaculars which are apriori Oral.
 
Between two  such Divergent views, which one is more applicable nowadays in linguistics .
 
It deserves a moment of reflection, does not it ? 
alllllll the best 
Dr Mostari 
 
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