[lg policy] Re: lgpolicy-list Digest, Vol 73, Issue 2

Scott Andrew Wible swible at umd.edu
Mon May 4 15:48:37 UTC 2015



On 5/4/15, 11:08 AM, "lgpolicy-list-request at groups.sas.upenn.edu"
<lgpolicy-list-request at groups.sas.upenn.edu> wrote:

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>
>Today's Topics:
>
>   1. Cornwall (and some Cornish) on BBC Radio 4 Today	programme
>      (Dave Sayers)
>   2. Old 'Swedish' town in US road sign spelling row (Francis Hult)
>   3. Linguist List Issue: Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking
>      World: Austin, Blume, S?nchez (The LINGUIST List)
>   4. Linguist List Issue: Further Studies in the Lesser-Known
>      Varieties of English: Williams, Schneider, Trudgill, Schreier
>      (eds.) (The LINGUIST List)
>   5. Indiana: State budget appropriations include funds for
>      language policy course (Harold Schiffman)
>   6. Montana Offers A Boost To Native Language Immersion	Programs
>      (Fierman, William)
>   7. Fwd: [lg policy] Montana Offers A Boost To Native Language
>      Immersion	Programs (Harold Schiffman)
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Message: 1
>Date: Fri, 01 May 2015 17:04:13 +0100
>From: Dave Sayers <dave.sayers at cantab.net>
>Subject: [lg policy] Cornwall (and some Cornish) on BBC Radio 4 Today
>	programme
>To: Language Policy List <lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>,
>	ENDANGERED-LANGUAGES-L at LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG,
>	LGPOLICY-LIST at LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG
>Message-ID: <5543A3FD.902 at cantab.net>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed
>
>Hi everyone,
>
>The BBC Radio 4 programme has been touring the country in the election
>buildup. This 
>morning had some bits across southwest England, including Cornwall, and
>had a few 
>features with bits of speaking Cornish. The programme is here:
>
>http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05s48ph
>
>The time indices for the southwest/Cornwall/Cornish bits (these themes
>run together 
>at times) are: 1h51m7s, 2h21m15s, 2h59m34s.
>
>Oll an gwella,
>Dave
>
>--
>Dr. Dave Sayers
>Senior Lecturer, Dept Humanities, Sheffield Hallam University
>Honorary Research Fellow, Arts & Humanities, Swansea University
>(2009-2015)
>dave.sayers at cantab.net | http://shu.academia.edu/DaveSayers
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 2
>Date: Sat, 2 May 2015 10:36:26 +0000
>From: Francis Hult <francis.hult at englund.lu.se>
>Subject: [lg policy] Old 'Swedish' town in US road sign spelling row
>To: "lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu"
>	<lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>
>Message-ID:
>	<11E8DB9B84AFED40AA11BE609088B771E9E97A37 at UWMBX02.uw.lu.se>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>The Local
>
>
>
>Old 'Swedish' town in US road sign spelling row
>
>
>
>Despite spelling the town Lindstr?m and using the slogan 'America's
>Little Sweden' on its website and marketing materials, local officials
>recently agreed to a new road sign spelling, swapping the Swedish letter
>'?', for a regular 'o'. The sign now indicates to drivers that they have
>arrived in Lindstrom.
>
>
>
>"We did ask MnDOT (Minnesota Department of Transportation) to let us keep
>the spelling but it is bound by new rules...."
>
>
>
>Full story:
>http://www.thelocal.se/20150413/us-in-swedish-town-spelling-row
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>------------------------------
>
>Message: 3
>Date: Sat, 2 May 2015 10:39:07 -0400 (EDT)
>From: The LINGUIST List <linguist at linguistlist.org>
>Subject: [lg policy] Linguist List Issue: Bilingualism in the
>	Spanish-Speaking World: Austin, Blume, S?nchez
>To: lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu
>Message-ID: <655602993.1131430577547821.JavaMail.railo at server>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
>
>HFS thought you might be interested in this item from the LINGUIST List
>--------------------------------------------------------------------------
>--------------
>HFS says ...
>
>
>--------------------------------------------------------------------------
>--------------
>
>Message1: Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World: Austin, Blume,
>S??nchez
>Date:01-May-2015
>From:Katie Laker klaker at cambridge.org
>LINGUIST List issue http://linguistlist.org/issues/26/26-2285.html
>
> 
>
>
>
>
>Title: Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World
>Subtitle: Linguistic and Cognitive Perspectives
>Publication Year: 2015
>Publisher: Cambridge University Press
>	   http://cambridge.org
>	
>
>Book URL: 
>http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/languages-linguistics/sociol
>inguistics/bilingualism-spanish-speaking-world-linguistic-and-cognitive-pe
>rspectives?format=PB
>
>
>Author: Jennifer Austin
>Author: Mar???a Blume
>Author: Liliana S???nchez
>
>Paperback: ISBN:  Pages:  Price: U.S. $ 39.99
>Paperback: ISBN:  Pages:  Price: U.K. ??? 24.99
>
>Linguistic Field(s): Language Acquisition
>                     Sociolinguistics
>
>Subject Language(s): Basque (eus)
>                     Catalan-Valencian-Balear (cat)
>                     Galician (glg)
>                     Spanish (spa)
>
>Language Family(ies): Quechuan
>
>
>Written In: English  (eng)
>
>See this book announcement on our website:
>http://linguistlist.org/get-book.html?BookID=84853
>
>
>
>Also you can take a look at it by visiting
>http://linguistlist.org/issues/26/26-2285.html
>
>Read other LINGUIST List posts:
>http://linguistlist.org/issues/index.cfm
>
>Get your own free subscription to The LINGUIST List:
>http://linguistlist.org/LL/subs-index.cfm
>
>
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 4
>Date: Sat, 2 May 2015 10:40:26 -0400 (EDT)
>From: The LINGUIST List <linguist at linguistlist.org>
>Subject: [lg policy] Linguist List Issue: Further Studies in the
>	Lesser-Known Varieties of English: Williams, Schneider, Trudgill,
>	Schreier (eds.)
>To: lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu
>Message-ID: <1463629853.1141430577626060.JavaMail.railo at server>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
>
>
>HFS thought you might be interested in this item from the LINGUIST List
>--------------------------------------------------------------------------
>--------------
>HFS says ...
>
>
>--------------------------------------------------------------------------
>--------------
>
>Message1: Further Studies in the Lesser-Known Varieties of English:
>Williams, Schneider, Trudgill, Schreier (eds.)
>Date:01-May-2015
>From:Katie Laker klaker at cambridge.org
>LINGUIST List issue http://linguistlist.org/issues/26/26-2288.html
>
> 
>
>
>
>
>Title: Further Studies in the Lesser-Known Varieties of English
>Publication Year: 2015
>Publisher: Cambridge University Press
>	   http://cambridge.org
>	
>
>Book URL: 
>http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/languages-linguistics/histor
>y-english-language/further-studies-lesser-known-varieties-english?format=H
>B
>
>
>Editor: Jeffrey P. Williams
>Editor: Edgar W. Schneider
>Editor: Peter Trudgill
>Editor: Daniel Schreier
>
>Hardback: ISBN:  Pages:  Price: U.S. $ 105.00
>Hardback: ISBN:  Pages:  Price: U.K. ??? 65.00
>
>Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
>                     Sociolinguistics
>                     Typology
>
>Subject Language(s): English (eng)
>
>
>Written In: English  (eng)
>
>See this book announcement on our website:
>http://linguistlist.org/get-book.html?BookID=84913
>
>
>
>Also you can take a look at it by visiting
>http://linguistlist.org/issues/26/26-2288.html
>
>Read other LINGUIST List posts:
>http://linguistlist.org/issues/index.cfm
>
>Get your own free subscription to The LINGUIST List:
>http://linguistlist.org/LL/subs-index.cfm
>
>
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Message: 5
>Date: Sat, 2 May 2015 11:00:07 -0400
>From: Harold Schiffman <hfsclpp at gmail.com>
>Subject: [lg policy] Indiana: State budget appropriations include
>	funds for language policy course
>To: lp <lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>
>Message-ID:
>	<CAB7VSRCUiZd-Dg4Qa3CgE8g22PL8JpdAVzhpRuO6dRsaMiq2JA at mail.gmail.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> State budget appropriations include USI???s portion of academic health
>science campus
>  5/1/2015 | John Farless
>  Share on facebook
><http://www.usi.edu/news/releases/2015/05/state-budget-appropriations-incl
>ude-usis-portion-of-academic-health-science-campus#>
>Share
>on twitter
><http://www.usi.edu/news/releases/2015/05/state-budget-appropriations-incl
>ude-usis-portion-of-academic-health-science-campus#>
>Share
>on email
><http://www.usi.edu/news/releases/2015/05/state-budget-appropriations-incl
>ude-usis-portion-of-academic-health-science-campus#>
>Share
>on print
><http://www.usi.edu/news/releases/2015/05/state-budget-appropriations-incl
>ude-usis-portion-of-academic-health-science-campus#>
>More
>Sharing Services
><http://www.usi.edu/news/releases/2015/05/state-budget-appropriations-incl
>ude-usis-portion-of-academic-health-science-campus#>
>0
><http://www.usi.edu/news/releases/2015/05/state-budget-appropriations-incl
>ude-usis-portion-of-academic-health-science-campus#>
>
>At its May 1 meeting on campus, the University of Southern Indiana Board
>of
>Trustees heard a report on the outcome of the 2015 Indiana General
>Assembly
>and a new two-year state budget. Cindy Brinker, vice president for
>Government and University Relations, provided a summary of the legislative
>session.
>
>Summary highlights included:
>
>   - The University???s operating appropriation will increase by
>   approximately 0.6 percent, from $44,146,854 in fiscal year 2015 to
>   $44,393,481 in fiscal year 2016 and 1.6 percent in fiscal year 2017 to
>   $44,858,559 over fiscal year 2015.
>   - $320,450 was appropriated for dual credit priority courses in fiscal
>   years 2016 and 2017.
>   - $1,997,500 was appropriated through the General Repair and
>   Rehabilitation funding formula for the biennium.
>   - $8 million in bonding authorization was approved for the renovation
>   and expansion of the Health Professions Center.
>   - $6 million in cash was appropriated for USI's part of the Academic
>   Health Science Campus with the IU School of Medicine in downtown
>Evansville.
>
>The University also will hold a public hearing in the next 30 days to
>discuss proposed tuition and mandatory fees for 2015-2017.
>
>A full summary of the biennial budget can be found at
>www.usi.edu/govrelations.
>
>*New Degrees*
>
>The board also approved two new degree programs, a Bachelor of Science in
>Respiratory Therapy and a Master of Arts in Second Language Acquisition,
>Policy and Culture. This marks the third new degree to be approved this
>year. The board approved a Master of Science in Sport Management at its
>April meeting.
>
>*Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Therapy *
>
>USI???s College of Nursing and Health Professions will offer a Bachelor of
>Science in Respiratory Therapy beginning in fall 2016, once approved by
>the
>Indiana Commission for Higher Education. The College currently offers a
>two-year associate degree program in respiratory therapy.
>
>Both the American Association for Respiratory Care and the National Board
>for Respiratory Care have indicated that the transition from associate
>degree programs to bachelor degree programs in respiratory therapy will be
>preferred over the next several years. USI???s new degree program is a
>direct
>response to the industry???s demand for higher educational standards and
>would enhance the body and complexity of knowledge and skills needed for
>advanced clinical practice and critical thinking. It also would allow
>graduates to become more involved in public health, outpatient care,
>homecare, smoking cessation and case management for asthma, COPD and
>cystic
>fibrosis clinics. The program will move beyond traditional teaching in
>hospital units and prepare graduates to be more involved in providing
>patient education and coordinating care in cost-effective approaches in
>multiple settings.
>
>*Master of Arts in Second Language Acquisition, Policy and Culture *
>
>Beginning summer 2016, USI???s College of Liberal Arts will offer a
>Master of
>Arts in Second Language Acquisition, Policy and Culture degree, pending
>approval by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education. The accelerated
>degree program can be completed in as little as one and a half years and
>offers two embedded certifications in Cultural Awareness Training and
>Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.
>
>An innovative and groundbreaking professional program, currently not
>offered at universities in the United States, the Master of Arts in Second
>Language Acquisition, Policy and Culture degree utilizes a blended mode of
>delivery; a collaborative approach that includes two USI colleges and
>three
>departments;  and combined advanced training in second language
>acquisition, language policy and culture studies. The master???s degree is
>intended to have a local, regional, national and international impact and
>offers knowledge and skills to teach foreign languages to non-English
>speakers, and provides professional *knowledge that will help shape public
>policy on multilingualism and multiculturalism.*
>
>In other business, the board appointed Steve Bridges, vice president for
>finance and administration, as treasurer; approved the annual audit plan;
>approved promotions, retirements and emeritus titles; and reviewed a
>report
>on current and proposed construction projects.
>
>http://www.usi.edu/news/releases/2015/05/state-budget-appropriations-inclu
>de-usis-portion-of-academic-health-science-campus
>
>-- 
>**************************************
>N.b.: Listing on the lgpolicy-list is merely intended as a service to its
>members
>and implies neither approval, confirmation nor agreement by the owner or
>sponsor of the list as to the veracity of a message's contents. Members
>who
>disagree with a message are encouraged to post a rebuttal, and to write
>directly to the original sender of any offensive message.  A copy of this
>may be forwarded to this list as well.  (H. Schiffman, Moderator)
>
>For more information about the lgpolicy-list, go to
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>------------------------------
>
>Message: 6
>Date: Sat, 2 May 2015 22:55:07 +0000
>From: "Fierman, William" <wfierman at indiana.edu>
>Subject: [lg policy] Montana Offers A Boost To Native Language
>	Immersion	Programs
>To: "Fierman, William" <wfierman at indiana.edu>
>Message-ID:
>	<DF956C7C2C8D6249BF292A64308450B72C0EE3FC at IU-MSSG-MBX108.ads.iu.edu>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>http://www.npr.org/2015/05/02/403576800/montana-offers-a-boost-to-native-l
>anguage-immersion-programs
>
>Montana Offers A Boost To Native Language Immersion Programs
>May 02, 2015 5:48 PM ET
>
>from
>MTPR
>Amy Martin
>Listen to the Story
>
>All Things Considered
>4:30
>
>At Montana's Nkwusm Salish Language School, teacher Echo Brown works with
>a student learning Salish words. Luk means "wood" or "stick." Picct means
>"leaf" and solsi translates to "fire."
>
>At Montana's Nkwusm Salish Language School, teacher Echo Brown works with
>a student learning Salish words. Luk means "wood" or "stick." Picct means
>"leaf" and solsi translates to "fire."
>Courtesy of Nkwusm Salish Language School
>
>Many Native Americans who attended a recent powwow in Missoula, Mont.,
>remember what it was like to be punished for speaking a tribal language.
>For about a century, starting in the 1870s, the U.S. Bureau of Indian
>Affairs ran boarding schools for Native American children, removing them
>from their families and homes and separating them from their language and
>culture so they would "assimilate."
>
>Carrie Iron Shirt's father was one of those children. "My dad, being in
>the boarding school, they were taught not to talk their language," she
>says.
>American Indian Boarding Schools Haunt Many
>
>Iron Shirt, 37, says her father still has bad memories of the treatment
>he received for speaking his native Blackfeet at school. "He didn't want
>us to go through that," she says. "So my generation missed out on the
>language."
>
>Iron Shirt tried to make up for that loss by enrolling her own daughter,
>Jade, in a private Blackfeet language immersion school. Now 16, Jade can
>speak the language fluently with her grandparents, something for which
>she's grateful.
>
>"You learn about your culture more," she says. "And that's what's more
>important, you know? 'Cause our culture is dying."
>
>Thanks to a new Montana state bill, expected to be signed into law this
>week, more Native American kids will have the same opportunity. The bill
>subsidizes Native American language immersion programs in public schools.
>
>As tribes have reclaimed the right to educate their own children in
>recent years, native language instruction has been introduced in some
>Montana schools. But this is the first time the state will be supporting
>immersion programs - which provide instruction in an indigenous language
>for at least half the school day.
>
>April Charlo was first exposed to her tribe's Salish language in a
>seventh grade class. She's now the executive director of the Nkwusm
>Salish Language School serving preschool through eighth-grade students on
>the Flathead Reservation in northwestern Montana.
>
>For Charlo, immersion programs aren't just about preserving indigenous
>tongues. She believes they are also essential for closing the achievement
>gap - an important consideration in Montana, where the high school
>graduation rate for American Indian students is almost 20 percentage
>points lower than for students of any other race or ethnicity.
>
>"The language and culture and tradition and ceremonies, they're
>interlocked, they're interlinked. So when a child is learning their
>language, it just goes right to that connection."
>
>- April Charlo, executive director of the Nkwusm Salish Language School
>
>"The language and culture and tradition and ceremonies, they're
>interlocked, they're interlinked," Charlo says. "So when a child is
>learning their language, it just goes right to that connection."
>
>And that connection, Charlo emphasizes, is what helps kids succeed. "It's
>just a confidence ... 'I know my language, I know where I come from.' "
>
>Under the bill, schools that are interested in creating immersion
>programs must apply to receive funding that will help compensate native
>language instructors.
>
>The only other state that provides funding for native language immersion
>in public schools is Hawaii, which has one native language. In Montana,
>there are nine.
>
>Jonathan Windy Boy, a Democratic state senator and a Chippewa Cree
>Indian, sponsored the immersion bill. "We're investing in a population of
>this state that has been neglected for too long," he says. "Investing in
>those human resources, I think ... is going to be the best investment
>that we can provide for all of Montana to be a better place to live in."
>
>The state legislature capped that investment at $22,500 total per year -
>half of what Windy Boy originally proposed and only enough to provide
>partial support to a handful of programs.
>
>But some of the bill's opponents, including Republican State Senator
>Roger Webb, think the cost of immersion programs should be borne
>exclusively by tribes.
>
>"I would rather see individuals, you know, learn Spanish or French or
>Chinese," Webb says. As for native language immersion, "If they really
>believe that that's an issue, it could be remedied on a home base."
>
>"The policies of the government ... helped almost eradicate the
>languages. So ... the state might as well put some money in to help bring
>it back."
>
>- Roy Big Crane, member of the Salish and Pend d'Oreille tribes
>
>But Montana resident Roy Big Crane, a member of the Salish and Pend
>d'Oreille tribes, emphasizes that the state has a special responsibility
>to help revive native languages.
>
>"It was through the policies of the government, the states, Christianity,
>public school systems, that helped almost eradicate the languages," he
>says. "So that circle might as well come back and the state might as well
>put some money in to help bring it back."
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>------------------------------
>
>Message: 7
>Date: Mon, 4 May 2015 11:00:33 -0400
>From: Harold Schiffman <haroldfs at gmail.com>
>Subject: Fwd: [lg policy] Montana Offers A Boost To Native Language
>	Immersion	Programs
>To: lp <lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>
>Message-ID:
>	<CACqQ=k+9b0dAU+WUC5rcu0LxsGZwNFOLsJa+WXkhtXZKBAD8DA at mail.gmail.com>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Forwarded From: Fierman, William <wfierman at indiana.edu>
>Date: Sat, May 2, 2015 at 6:55 PM
> [lg policy] Montana Offers A Boost To Native Language Immersion Programs
>
>
>
>http://www.npr.org/2015/05/02/403576800/montana-offers-a-boost-to-native-l
>anguage-immersion-programs
>
>
>
>Montana Offers A Boost To Native Language Immersion Programs
>
>May 02, 2015 5:48 PM ET
>
>
>
>from
>
>MTPR
>
>Amy Martin
>
>Listen to the Story
>
>
>
>All Things Considered
>
>4:30
>
>
>
>At Montana's Nkwusm Salish Language School, teacher Echo Brown works with
>a
>student learning Salish words. Luk means "wood" or "stick." Picct means
>"leaf" and solsi translates to "fire."
>
>
>
>At Montana's Nkwusm Salish Language School, teacher Echo Brown works with
>a
>student learning Salish words. Luk means "wood" or "stick." Picct means
>"leaf" and solsi translates to "fire."
>
>Courtesy of Nkwusm Salish Language School
>
>
>
>Many Native Americans who attended a recent powwow in Missoula, Mont.,
>remember what it was like to be punished for speaking a tribal language.
>For about a century, starting in the 1870s, the U.S. Bureau of Indian
>Affairs ran boarding schools for Native American children, removing them
>from their families and homes and separating them from their language and
>culture so they would "assimilate."
>
>
>
>Carrie Iron Shirt's father was one of those children. "My dad, being in
>the
>boarding school, they were taught not to talk their language," she says.
>
>American Indian Boarding Schools Haunt Many
>
>
>
>Iron Shirt, 37, says her father still has bad memories of the treatment he
>received for speaking his native Blackfeet at school. "He didn't want us
>to
>go through that," she says. "So my generation missed out on the language."
>
>
>
>Iron Shirt tried to make up for that loss by enrolling her own daughter,
>Jade, in a private Blackfeet language immersion school. Now 16, Jade can
>speak the language fluently with her grandparents, something for which
>she's grateful.
>
>
>
>"You learn about your culture more," she says. "And that's what's more
>important, you know? 'Cause our culture is dying."
>
>
>
>Thanks to a new Montana state bill, expected to be signed into law this
>week, more Native American kids will have the same opportunity. The bill
>subsidizes Native American language immersion programs in public schools.
>
>
>
>As tribes have reclaimed the right to educate their own children in recent
>years, native language instruction has been introduced in some Montana
>schools. But this is the first time the state will be supporting immersion
>programs ??? which provide instruction in an indigenous language for at
>least
>half the school day.
>
>
>
>April Charlo was first exposed to her tribe's Salish language in a seventh
>grade class. She's now the executive director of the Nkwusm Salish
>Language
>School serving preschool through eighth-grade students on the Flathead
>Reservation in northwestern Montana.
>
>
>
>For Charlo, immersion programs aren't just about preserving indigenous
>tongues. She believes they are also essential for closing the achievement
>gap ??? an important consideration in Montana, where the high school
>graduation rate for American Indian students is almost 20 percentage
>points
>lower than for students of any other race or ethnicity.
>
>
>
>"The language and culture and tradition and ceremonies, they're
>interlocked, they're interlinked. So when a child is learning their
>language, it just goes right to that connection."
>
>
>
>- April Charlo, executive director of the Nkwusm Salish Language School
>
>
>
>"The language and culture and tradition and ceremonies, they're
>interlocked, they're interlinked," Charlo says. "So when a child is
>learning their language, it just goes right to that connection."
>
>
>
>And that connection, Charlo emphasizes, is what helps kids succeed. "It's
>just a confidence ... 'I know my language, I know where I come from.' "
>
>
>
>Under the bill, schools that are interested in creating immersion programs
>must apply to receive funding that will help compensate native language
>instructors.
>
>
>
>The only other state that provides funding for native language immersion
>in
>public schools is Hawaii, which has one native language. In Montana, there
>are nine.
>
>
>
>Jonathan Windy Boy, a Democratic state senator and a Chippewa Cree Indian,
>sponsored the immersion bill. "We're investing in a population of this
>state that has been neglected for too long," he says. "Investing in those
>human resources, I think ... is going to be the best investment that we
>can
>provide for all of Montana to be a better place to live in."
>
>
>
>The state legislature capped that investment at $22,500 total per year ???
>half of what Windy Boy originally proposed and only enough to provide
>partial support to a handful of programs.
>
>
>
>But some of the bill's opponents, including Republican State Senator Roger
>Webb, think the cost of immersion programs should be borne exclusively by
>tribes.
>
>
>
>"I would rather see individuals, you know, learn Spanish or French or
>Chinese," Webb says. As for native language immersion, "If they really
>believe that that's an issue, it could be remedied on a home base."
>
>
>
>"The policies of the government ... helped almost eradicate the languages.
>So ... the state might as well put some money in to help bring it back."
>
>
>
>- Roy Big Crane, member of the Salish and Pend d'Oreille tribes
>
>
>
>But Montana resident Roy Big Crane, a member of the Salish and Pend
>d'Oreille tribes, emphasizes that the state has a special responsibility
>to
>help revive native languages.
>
>
>
>"It was through the policies of the government, the states, Christianity,
>public school systems, that helped almost eradicate the languages," he
>says. "So that circle might as well come back and the state might as well
>put some money in to help bring it back."
>
>_______________________________________________
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>
>
>
>
>-- 
>=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
>
> Harold F. Schiffman
>
>Professor Emeritus of
> Dravidian Linguistics and Culture
>Dept. of South Asia Studies
>University of Pennsylvania
>Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305
>
>Phone:  (215) 898-7475
>Fax:  (215) 573-2138
>
>Email:  haroldfs at gmail.com
>http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/~haroldfs/
>
>-------------------------------------------------
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