[lg policy] Re: lgpolicy-list Digest, Vol 77, Issue 2

Kennedyper at aol.com Kennedyper at aol.com
Wed Sep 2 15:33:26 UTC 2015


Hi Hal,
 
How are you doing?

Check out this Jeopardy question for tonight's show...compliments of  the 
NY Times...
 
 
 
SUBJECT: THE NATIONAL INVENTORS HALL OF FAME
 
He gave his name to a pressure-ignited internal combustion engine and was  
also a linguist
 
 
 
The correct response will be on the show tonight and in tomorrows  paper.
 
Have a great day.

Tom
 
 
In a message dated 9/2/2015 11:28:35 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,  
lgpolicy-list-request at groups.sas.upenn.edu writes:

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Today's Topics:

1.  North Carolina State Students Will Be PUNISHED For ?Sexist?
Language (Harold Schiffman)
2. South Africa: Classes  temporarily suspended as EFF members
lock lecture  halls (Harold Schiffman)
3. South Africa: Lessons From India  On Decolonising Language and
Thought At Universities  (Harold Schiffman)
4. Linguist List Issue: The Making of  Vernacular Singapore
English: Bao (The LINGUIST  List)
5. Linguist List Issue: Germanic Heritage Languages in  North
America: Johannessen, Salmons (eds.) (The  LINGUIST List)
6. Foreign Language Policies: Is Everyone Else  Really    Speaking
English? (Harold  Schiffman)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message:  1
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 15:18:58 -0400
From: Harold Schiffman  <hfsclpp at gmail.com>
Subject: [lg policy] North Carolina State  Students Will Be PUNISHED
For ?Sexist? Language
To: lp  <lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>
Message-ID:
<CAB7VSRDVsFYKSd+2FcMt_ehxAyLShpWFxvuS0g0YOimrDT2R+w at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type:  text/plain; charset="utf-8"

NC State Students Will Be PUNISHED For  ‘Sexist’  Language

<http://license.icopyright.net:80/rights/oneButtonTag.act?tag=3.16718?icx_id
=31553>

By  Blake Neff

A professor at North Carolina State University is warning  students in her
gender studies class to refrain from using any “sexist  language” in 
their
writing, or else face penalties to their  grades.

The sexism that professor Nancy Bishop hopes to squelch  includes words such
as “mankind” and the word “he” when used to  describe a 
non-gendered person.

“Thanks to evolution, generalized  pronouns and other biased references 
are
no longer acceptable in any  class,” warns Bishop in a syllabus obtained 
by
The College Fix  <http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/24025/>. “You may 
*NOT*  use
‘he’ or ‘him’ or ‘man’ to refer to both men and women.  â
€˜Mankind’ can be
replaced by ‘humans’ or ‘humankind,’ and  ‘he’ can be ‘
she or he.’”

The College Fix reached out to  Bishop to ask why she was pursuing such a
strict language policy. Bishop  replied by saying the rules were necessary
for proper “time management”  and to prevent more significant slurs 
against
women.

“When  addressing women in an academic setting—especially an online 
one  [the
class is online-only], some students feel that by being behind a  computer
keyboard they are ‘free’ to address women and even women  addressing 
men as
something other than what is really respectful,” Bishop  told them. “I 
have
had students call women ‘bitches’ and ‘gold  digging ho’s’ 
or label women as
‘maid’s or the dishwasher,’”  she said.

Bishop argued that with strict rules she will spend less time  “putting 
out
fires” while also training students that they can “live  and function 
in a
world without sexism.”

Bishop’s approach is  hardly unprecedented at colleges these days. At
Washington State  University, one faculty member has abolished use of the
word “female,”  while another has threatened to slash students’ 
grades if
they ever use  the term “illegal alien.” *(RELATED: Taxpayer-Funded
Professors Censor  Words ’Female,’ ‘Illegal  Alien’)
<http://dailycaller.com/2015/08/31/taxpayer-funded-professors-censor-words-f
emale-illegal-alien-and-make-white-students-defer/>*

Read  more:
http://thelibertarianrepublic.com/nc-state-students-will-be-punished-for-sex
ist-language/#ixzz3kW4H3Hjq
Follow  us: @TheLibRepublic on  Twitter
<http://ec.tynt.com/b/rw?id=agbceMWC8r5i0Nacwqm_6r&u=TheLibRepublic>


--  
**************************************
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Message:  2
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 15:21:16 -0400
From: Harold Schiffman  <hfsclpp at gmail.com>
Subject: [lg policy] South Africa: Classes  temporarily suspended as
EFF members lock lecture  halls
To: lp  <lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>
Message-ID:
<CAB7VSRBoHezJxESy_SdsyUtzWSTqBSCONo8ezn0JTukyPpyj2A at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type:  text/plain; charset="utf-8"

l
Classes temporarily suspended as EFF  members lock lecture halls 2015-08-31
21:16

Mpho Raborife,  News24
[image: (Alexander Joe, AFP)]

(Alexander Joe,  AFP)

<http://www.news24.com/Multimedia>

Johannesburg - A  group of EFF members disrupted classes at the Elsenburg
Agricultural  Training Institute on Monday by locking students out of
classrooms, the  Western Cape Department of Agriculture said on Monday.

"When we got  there, a small group of [EFF members] had padlocked the
classrooms and  prevented students from attending classes," spokesperson
Petro van Rhyn  said.

She said the institution's management and officials from the  department
tried to speak to the group of no more than 20, but they would  not budge.

"Classes resumed after 12:00, after the Public Order Police  were called in
to break the locks."

Van Rhyn said the group was made  up of a few students and a number of
"outside parties".

No arrests  were made, but any students involved in the incident would face
the  repercussions for bridging the institution's Code of Conduct, she  
said.

There has been an ongoing dispute over a policy about the  language of
instruction at the institution.

The college's Student  Representative Council (SRC) say they felt that
non-white, non-Afrikaans  speaking students were still being victimised.

Classes were disrupted  two weeks ago by students unhappy with the
implementation of the  institution's dual English/Afrikaans language policy.

SRC chairperson  Sabelo Ngcobo has previously said Afrikaans was being
prioritised. They  wanted classes to be in English only.

On Monday, AfriForum Youth  accused the group of swearing at white students
and spitting in their faces  during their protest.

"It is clear that today's riot did not focus on  language issues, but rather
on provoking a racial incident," AfriForum  Youth's national chairperson
Henk Maree said.

An urgent court  interdict would be launched to force the institution's
management to call  in police reinforcements on the campus, he said.

"The safety of  students and access to education are the most important
priorities and we  will do everything in our power to enforce this and see
that students'  rights are protected."

Third year student and EFF member Liphelo  Mpumlwana said locking the
classroom doors was a symbol of the students'  stance on the oppressive
"Afrikaner" culture at the college.

"Today  we decided to protest, part of it was locking the lecture halls. It
was  part of a signal of our [frustration] against the culture [here]."

She  said the group of protesters was not violent and only reacted  when
provoked.

"We didn't spit in their faces, we only responded to  words that were said
to  us."

http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Classes-temporarily-suspended-as-EFF-
members-lock-lecture-halls-20150831

--  
**************************************
N.b.: Listing on the  lgpolicy-list is merely intended as a service to its
members
and implies  neither approval, confirmation nor agreement by the owner or
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disagree with  a message are encouraged to post a rebuttal, and to write
directly to the  original sender of any offensive message.  A copy of this
may be  forwarded to this list as well.  (H. Schiffman, Moderator)

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Message:  3
Date: Tue, 1 Sep 2015 15:25:25 -0400
From: Harold Schiffman  <hfsclpp at gmail.com>
Subject: [lg policy] South Africa: Lessons From  India On Decolonising
Language and Thought At  Universities
To: lp  <lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>
Message-ID:
<CAB7VSRBByFwmUn2H-w-1mX3m9qKv8EBoV=YKnG2HfRh9JnUMNQ at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type:  text/plain; charset="utf-8"

South Africa: Lessons From India On  Decolonising Language and Thought At
Universities

By Dilip Menon,  University of the Witwatersrand

Foundation essay: Our foundation essays  are longer than usual and take a
wider look at key issues affecting  society.

Susa lo-mtunzi gawena. Hayikona shukumisa lo saka

"Move  your shadow. Don't rattle the bag." - JD Bold, Fanagalo Phrase  Book,
Grammar and Dictionary, the Lingua Franca of Southern Africa, 10th  Edition,
1977

In South Africa's bad old days white people spoke  English or Afrikaans.
These were the languages of command. When needing to  engage with those who
didn't speak English, whites could use Fanagalo - a  pidgin based on Zulu
and peppered with English and some Afrikaans. It was  developed on the
country's mines and was good for giving orders, if not  having a
conversation.

In this piece I want to look in particular at  the question of knowledge and
our universities in South Africa. There is a  struggle afoot to change the
racial composition of the faculty and students  at universities to move
towards transformation.

It is abundantly  clear that equal attention is not being paid to the
questions of both the  language of instruction and the content of syllabi in
South African  universities. English still dominates instruction at the
major  universities, as does Euro American knowledge.

There are some small  steps towards change. The University of Witwatersrand,
where I work,  recently tabled a multilingual policy. It will incorporate
Sesotho and  isiZulu as co-languages, along with English as an official part
of campus  life, in and outside the classroom.

Are there any lessons that South  Africa's universities can learn from India
on this journey? After all, from  the very moment of independence in India,
a debate began about the  landscape of language in the university space.

A three-language  policy

India's three language formula - mother tongue, regional  language and
English - was hammered out in 1956. It represented a whittling  down from
the original six language formula which envisaged the learning of  Sanskrit,
Persian/Arabic, and a European language.
--  
**************************************
N.b.: Listing on the  lgpolicy-list is merely intended as a service to its
members
and implies  neither approval, confirmation nor agreement by the owner or
sponsor of the  list as to the veracity of a message's contents. Members who
disagree with  a message are encouraged to post a rebuttal, and to write
directly to the  original sender of any offensive message.  A copy of this
may be  forwarded to this list as well.  (H. Schiffman, Moderator)

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Message:  4
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 11:20:12 -0400 (EDT)
From: The LINGUIST List  <linguist at linguistlist.org>
Subject: [lg policy] Linguist List Issue:  The Making of Vernacular
Singapore English: Bao
To:  lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu
Message-ID:  <500753903.1141441207212779.JavaMail.railo at server>
Content-Type:  text/plain; charset=UTF-8


HFS thought you might be interested in  this item from the LINGUIST  List
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------
HFS  says  ...


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------

Message1:  The Making of Vernacular Singapore English:  Bao
Date:01-Sep-2015
From:Katie Laker klaker at cambridge.org
LINGUIST  List issue  http://linguistlist.org/issues/26/26-3857.html






Title:  The Making of Vernacular Singapore English 
Subtitle: System, Transfer, and  Filter 
Publication Year: 2015 
Publisher: Cambridge University  Press
http://cambridge.org


Book URL:  
http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/languages-linguistics/asian-language-and-linguistics/making-vernacular-singapore-english-system
-transfer-and-filter?format=HB


Author:  Zhiming Bao

Hardback: ISBN:  Pages:  Price: U.S. $  110.00
Hardback: ISBN:  Pages:  Price: U.K. �  69.99

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics
Historical  Linguistics
Sociolinguistics

Subject Language(s): English  (eng)


Written In: English  (eng)

See this book  announcement on our  website:
http://linguistlist.org/get-book.html?BookID=89773



Also  you can take a look at it by  visiting
http://linguistlist.org/issues/26/26-3857.html

Read other  LINGUIST List posts:
http://linguistlist.org/issues/index.cfm

Get  your own free subscription to The LINGUIST  List:
http://linguistlist.org/LL/subs-index.cfm






------------------------------

Message:  5
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 11:24:13 -0400 (EDT)
From: The LINGUIST List  <linguist at linguistlist.org>
Subject: [lg policy] Linguist List Issue:  Germanic Heritage Languages
in North America: Johannessen,  Salmons (eds.)
To: lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu
Message-ID:  <1007676202.1151441207453583.JavaMail.railo at server>
Content-Type:  text/plain; charset=UTF-8


HFS thought you might be interested in  this item from the LINGUIST  List
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------
HFS  says  ...


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------

Message1:  Germanic Heritage Languages in North America: Johannessen, 
Salmons  (eds.)
Date:01-Sep-2015
From:Karin Plijnaar  karin.plijnaar at benjamins.nl
LINGUIST List issue  http://linguistlist.org/issues/26/26-3860.html






Title:  Germanic Heritage Languages in North America 
Subtitle: Acquisition,  attrition and change 
Series Title: Studies in Language Variation 18   

Publication Year: 2015 
Publisher: John Benjamins
http://www.benjamins.com/


Book URL:  https://benjamins.com/catalog/silv.18


Editor: Janne Bondi  Johannessen
Editor: Joseph C. Salmons

Electronic: ISBN:   Pages:  Price: U.S. $ 0.00 Comment: Open Access
Hardback: ISBN:   Pages:  Price: U.S. $ 158.00
Hardback: ISBN:  Pages:  Price:  U.K. � 88.00
Hardback: ISBN:  Pages:  Price: Europe EURO  111.30

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics
Historical  Linguistics
Language Acquisition
Sociolinguistics

Subject Language(s):  Dutch (nld)
English (eng)
Frisian, Western (fri)
German (deu)
Icelandic  (isl)
Norwegian Bokm�l (nob)
German, Pennsylvania (pdc)
Swedish  (swe)
Yiddish, Eastern (ydd)
Yiddish, Western  (yih)

Language Family(ies): Germanic


Written In:  English  (eng)

See this book announcement on our  website:
http://linguistlist.org/get-book.html?BookID=89814



Also  you can take a look at it by  visiting
http://linguistlist.org/issues/26/26-3860.html

Read other  LINGUIST List posts:
http://linguistlist.org/issues/index.cfm

Get  your own free subscription to The LINGUIST  List:
http://linguistlist.org/LL/subs-index.cfm






------------------------------

Message:  6
Date: Wed, 2 Sep 2015 11:28:17 -0400
From: Harold Schiffman  <hfsclpp at gmail.com>
Subject: [lg policy] Foreign Language Policies:  Is Everyone Else
Really    Speaking English?
To:  lp <lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>
Message-ID:
<CAB7VSRDdso5VT3PFEi9U7fYx3fSKEASNKRHs6340G8d9AoNi+A at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type:  text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Foreign Language Policies: Is Everyone Else  Really Speaking English?
By Heather  Singmaster
<http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/global_learning/> on  September
1, 2015 7:00 PM

Only  25%
<http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/07/13/learning-a-foreign-language
-a-must-in-europe-not-so-in-america/>
of  Americans speak a second language. We rest on our laurels as speakers  
of
English, believing that everyone else is learning our language—the  
language
of business. And in many countries across the globe, English is  being
taught. However, studying English doesn't always equal fluency or  even a
conversational speaking level (think back to your one or two years  of high
school Spanish or French!). Plus, not everyone is on the  English
bandwagon—by some estimates, 75%  
<http://languagemagazine.com/?page_id=6466>
of the world does not  speak English.

Let's explore some of the policies other countries have  regarding
English—and why they matter to the U.S.


*We are  losing money*[image: languages.jpg]A recent and well-publicized
report by  the Pew Research  Center
<http://qz.com/453297/many-european-kids-learn-two-foreign-languages-by-age-
9-most-americans-zero/>
showed  that most European students are learning a second language, and for
a  majority of them, this means learning English (over 90% of  secondary
students and 73% of primary students). However—and this  shouldn't come 
as a
surprise—Ireland and Scotland, two native  English-speaking countries, 
are
the only countries in Europe that currently  do not require students to
learn another language (but in fairness to  Ireland, their students learn in
English and Irish).

Starting in  2016, taking language classes may be voluntary in  Britain
<http://www.economist.com/news/britain/21645247-woeful-approach-language-edu
cation-continues-shout-louder>
as
well.  But having the same arrogant attitude toward learning languages as
the U.S.  could cost Britain. James Foreman-Peck of Cardiff University
estimates the  potential income lost from international trade because of a
lack of  language proficiency is around 3.5% of GDP or £59 billion  ($90
billion
<http://www.economist.com/news/britain/21645247-woeful-approach-language-edu
cation-continues-shout-louder>)—something
he  calls the "gross language effect." Can you imagine how much larger  that
number would be if the same study was done on the U.S.? As Nick  Brown
<http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/apr/14/seven-language-learning-uk
-multilinguilism>,
a  business leader, said: "English is fine if you want to buy things, but
it's  not the right language to use for people who want to sell things." In
other  words, learning a language is your key into the local culture and
local  economy.

Not all native English-speaking locales are waiting for the  world to learn
our language. In New  Zealand
<http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11438943>,
where  20% of students currently study a second language (the lowest
percentage  since the 1930s),  Auckland
<http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/67004998/auckland-council-gives-regional-la
nguages-strategy-thumbs-up>
is  developing a regional languages strategy. This is seen as a first  step
toward increasing language offerings in schools to build capacity to  meet
increasing tourism and trade  demands.


*Diversity*Canada
<http://toronto.ctvnews.ca/number-of-students-enrolled-in-tdsb-s-summer-lang
uage-programs-doubles-1.2500694>
is  also ahead of the United States. We all know they speak French in
Quebec,  but in Toronto, an extremely  diverse
<http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/global_learning/2015/03/toronto_developing_e
quity_through_global_competence.html>
city,  2,000 elementary students were studying a second language for free
over the  summer, courtesy of the Toronto District School Board. "It's not
only first  generation newcomers, but it's second and third generation young
parents  who want their children to understand their cultural and  
linguistic
background," says Karen Falconer, the Executive Superintendent  of
International Education.

Here in the U.S., our growing  diversity
<http://asiasociety.org/mapping-nation/> is helping to  drive the demand
for translation services, which is now our fifth  fastest-growing
<http://articles.philly.com/2015-08-11/business/65419439_1_language-care-cam
bridge>
occupation.  Just look at  Houston
<http://www.chron.com/jobs/article/Houston-shows-a-translator-interpreter-st
affing-6377905.php>,
one  of our most diverse cities, which is facing a shortage of  local
interpreters. The Houston Independent School  District
<http://www.hisdchoice.com/dual_languages> (HISD),  recognizing these
challenges, is committed to the teaching of world  languages. Arabic is the
second most spoken language in the city after  Spanish, so it makes sense
that HISD opened a public Arabic immersion  school this year, the first in
the country. But not everyone agrees: a  dozen protestors outside on the
first day felt that these students should  be receiving  English-only
<http://www.khou.com/story/news/local/2015/08/24/hisd-open-arabic-language-i
mmersion-magnet-school-monday/32253827/>
education.


*We  are limiting higher education*An increasing number of  universities
<http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/10369467/More-European-u
niversities-teaching-students-in-English.html>
across  Europe and the world are mandating that at least some courses, if
not  entire programs of study, be taught in English. But not all faculty
agree  with these policies, which are usually set by the administration.  In
Italy
<http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/27/opinion/italys-
new-lingua-franca.html?_r=2>,
the  Milan Polytechnic administration moved to teach masters degrees in
English  only. But the faculty cried foul and are trying to block it. The
policy is  currently under consideration by the Constitutional Court—the
highest  court in Italy.

Even if university faculty agree with English language  policies, that
doesn't mean that they can immediately flip a switch and  teach with the
same degree of expertise in English—or that students will  have the same
degree of comprehension. Take for example  France
<http://www.thelocal.fr/20131112/english-proficiency-in-france-on-the-declin
e>,
where  there was a huge uproar over allowing universities to teach courses
in  English, which was outlawed until the summer of 2013. With many policies
in  place to protect the French language, the country has the weakest
English  skills of all European countries.

Anna Kristina Hultgren, a lecturer in  English language and applied
linguistics at Britain's Open University, has  studied Nordic  countries
<https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/06/02/experts-consider-impact-engl
ish-global-language-instruction>
where  there is a high degree of English ability. Even so, she found that
having  to cope with English instruction meant professors and students
progressed  much more slowly in their courses.

And in places like South Africa  where there is still a huge disparity in
the education of blacks and  whites, English instruction leaves behind black
students. "The young people  who are from groups that were marginalized
under apartheid are still  marginalized, and those who were privileged are
still privileged," says  Russell H. Kaschula, a professor of African
language studies at Rhodes  University, in South  Africa
<https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/06/02/experts-consider-impact-engl
ish-global-language-instruction>
.


*Defense*Iran  and Iraq are two of the lowest ranking countries on the
Education First  English proficiency index <http://www.ef.edu/epi/>. If we
are going  to be involved in security issues in these nations, we need to
speak their  language—conversing with the locals opens many doors and 
leads
to better  intelligence information. CW2 Rachid  Akhrid
<http://foreignpolicy.com/2015/08/31/u-s-military-cultural-awareness-i-was-a
-pro-saddam-protestor-was-called-a-camel-jockey-but-i-am-an-american-soldier
-2/>,
a  Military Intelligence Officer in the United States Army, states that  his
language and cultural abilities saved his unit more than once,  including
the time they were lost and he was able to get directions from  the locals
to get everyone back to base.

We continue to face large  shortages in speakers of critical languages like
Arabic and Persian, not to  mention Korean and Chinese. This could be the
motive for a bipartisan group  of members of the House of Representatives
who recently asked the  Department of  Defense
<http://www.military.com/daily-news/2015/07/15/lawmakers-seek-to-reverse-cut
s-to-foreign-language-training.html>
(DoD)  to put more funding for world languages back into the 2016 budget.
The DoD  wanted to cut $31  million
<http://www.military.com/daily-news/2015/07/15/lawmakers-seek-to-reverse-cut
s-to-foreign-language-training.html>
out  of the $261 million budget of the Defense Language Institute  Foreign
Language Center <http://www.dliflc.edu/>.


*English  may not always be number  one*Malaysian
<http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/category/nation/2015/02/04/mastering-a-thi
rd-language-will-help-not-hinder-malays/>
parents  are concerned that learning two languages—English and Malay—
is  not
enough to be successful. So now many are pushing their children to  learn a
third— this often means Mandarin, as it is seen as opening doors  to 
future
jobs. Some parents are even favoring Chinese over English as  China's sphere
of influence grows in the region.

Malaysians aren't  the only ones learning Chinese around the globe: 750,000
people took the  Official Chinese  Language
<http://www.cctv-america.com/2015/03/03/chinese-as-a-second-language-growing
-in-popularity>
Proficiency  test in 2010. While Chinese is not going to replace English
anytime soon,  it is growing in importance. In the U.S. alone, college
enrollment in  Chinese courses has jumped up by 51% since 2002.

*Cognitive benefits*We  should not forget about the many cognitive reasons
to learn another  language, which I have outlined in a previous post (ward
off  Alzheimer's
<http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/global_learning/2013/12/bilingualism_valuabl
e_for_the_brain_and_society.html?qs=singmaster+global+learning+langauges>,
plus  grow a bigger brain!).  Japan
<http://www.bbc.com/news/business-32013613> feels its students,  who are
studying abroad less than in the past, are growing too insular and  are seen
as bored and not very motivated, and therefore, less competitive  in the
international economy. One way the government is combating this is  by
lowering the age that students begin to learn English from age 13 to age  10
(5th grade). Rachel Sharp, Head of Languages at Cambridge  International
School, agrees with this idea. She says that language study  is a way
to  overcome
apathy
<http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/Cambridge-teacher-learning-foreign-language
s/story-26189049-detail/story.html>,
increase  tolerance and acceptance of others, and enhance life skills. Why
wouldn't  we too want this for our youth?

Not everyone is speaking English, and  we can't expect them to. There are so
many benefits that we are currently  missing out on in our monolingual
bubble: enhanced business opportunities,  smarter kids, stronger national
defense, and better communication within  our local communities just to name
a few. So what do you say, America: can  we stop turning a deaf ear to the
rest of the  world?
http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/global_learning/2015/09/foreign_language_poli
cies_around_the_world_is_everyone_else_really_speaking_english.html

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