[lg policy] Latinos And Others Find Trump's Offensive Twitter Language Not Unusual

Harold Schiffman haroldfs at gmail.com
Mon Apr 23 11:58:50 EDT 2018


 Latinos And Others Find Trump's Offensive Twitter Language Not Unusual
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April 22, 20187:42 AM ET
Heard on Weekend Edition Sunday
<https://www.npr.org/programs/weekend-edition-sunday/2018/04/22/604701866/weekend-edition-sunday-for-april-22-2018>

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to Pilar Marrero, a writer at the Spanish
language daily *La Opinion* in Los Angeles, about President Trump's recent
tweets attacking California's sanctuary laws.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

This past week, President Trump took to Twitter to attack California's
sanctuary laws using infested and breeding, words more commonly associated
with pests than people. To get reaction from the Latino community in
California, we're joined now by Pilar Marrero, a writer at the Spanish
language daily La Opinion in LA. Welcome to the program.

PILAR MARRERO: Thank you for having me.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So in a long line of Trump's offensive language about
Latinos and other brown and black people, did this tweet stand out to you?

MARRERO: Actually, not particularly because this has been a constant for
President Trump, even before he was president. As we all remember, the day
he launched his candidacy, he started calling out Mexicans and people who
crossed the border. They're a bunch of rapists and narco traffickers.
Although, I must say his use of the word breeding and crime-infested was
particularly nasty. And it is tied to language that has been used
historically to dehumanize particular groups of people.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You write about Trump for the Latino community. How are
these comments being viewed by Latinos more widely?

MARRERO: Not well. Many families are mixed and have people who are citizens
and legal residents and may have someone who's out of status for some
reason. And there's a lot of people who, you know, may employ or may be
close to folks who are immigrants. And, yeah, everyone's fearful, obviously.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: As a reporter for - in a Spanish language daily, what is
the thing that the Latino community is really looking at closely now? I
mean, what are the things that they're really paying attention to?

MARRERO: Obviously, immigration is important. People are also fearful that
the chaos going on in the country will affect the economy. Massive
deportations, disruption of education because for example, you know, there
was recently a major raid in Tennessee at a meat-packing company. And
following that, people stopped sending their kids to school.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: California's taken a stand against the Trump
administration's immigration policies, and it's been targeted by the
president for that. What's the sense there generally in California, which
is overwhelmingly Democratic? Is it a rallying cry among voters?

MARRERO: California, I think, learned its lessons 20, 25 years ago, you
know? If you remember, Proposition 187 in 1994 really brought people out to
vote.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Proposition 187 was a proposition that basically targeted
health and education services for undocumented immigrants.

MARRERO: Yes. It brought Latinos to naturalize. And there's an indication
that Latinos are again going to naturalization as a tool, not just for
defense because you are more secure in this country if you naturalize as
opposed to just having a green card. So I think California is a swell place
to continue to resist and to do what we feel we should do in terms of
immigration policy and other policies.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's Pilar Marrero, a writer at the Spanish language
daily La Opinion in LA. Thank you so much.

MARRERO: Thank you, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MASERATI'S "SYNCHRONICITY IV")


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 Harold F. Schiffman

Professor Emeritus of
 Dravidian Linguistics and Culture
Dept. of South Asia Studies
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305

Phone:  (215) 898-7475
Fax:  (215) 573-2138

Email:  haroldfs at gmail.com
http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/~haroldfs/

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