Re: [lg policy] Andrey Petrov on Vesti.FM: Azerbaijani and Ukrainian will not cease to be the official languages ​​of Russia

Harold Schiffman haroldfs at gmail.com
Tue Dec 11 12:34:14 EST 2018


Aidan,

I'm sorry, but after I contacted the tech people at Penn, Ionly got error
messages from them, but not even a personal
response.  'All I can say is please be patient.

Best,

Hal S.

On Mon, Dec 10, 2018 at 11:24 AM Aidan Pine <aidanpine at shaw.ca> wrote:

> Hi Harold,
>
> Any update on being able to unsubscribe?
>
> Thank you.
>
> Best,
>
> Aidan
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Harold Schiffman <haroldfs at gmail.com>
> To: lp <lgpolicy-list at groups.sas.upenn.edu>
> Sent: Mon, 10 Dec 2018 09:20:25 -0700 (MST)
> Subject: [lg policy] Andrey Petrov on Vesti.FM: Azerbaijani and Ukrainian
> will not cease to be the official languages ​​of Russia
>
> Andrey Petrov on Vesti.FM: Azerbaijani and Ukrainian will not cease to be
> the official languages of Russia
> 8 Dec in 17:20
> [image: Andrey Petrov on Vesti.FM: Azerbaijani and Ukrainian will not cease
> to be the official languages of Russia]
> <
> http://vestnikkavkaza.net/upload2/2018-12-08/15442787515c0bd2dff205f6.41372854.jpg
> >
>
> The state status of republican languages in Russia does not depend on the
> relations of the Russian Federation with those countries where these
> languages are spoken and, in particular, are official, the senior analyst
> of Vestnik Kavkaza, Andrey Petrov, said in the National Question program on
> Vesti.FM, speaking about the issue of preserving the culture of the
> post-Soviet countries in Russia, often questioned by political opponents
> from the Baltic states and Ukraine.
>
> First of all, the analyst recalled that Russia is a country of the most
> liberal language policy. “Not everyone knows that there are more than 30
> state languages in Russia, and this includes the official languages of
> foreign countries. In 64 regions, there is only one such language -
> Russian, but in 21 regions - in the republics - indigenous languages also
> have the status of state languages. Perhaps this is due to our legislation,
> according to which the republics in the Federation have a special form of
> statehood of the Russian peoples: they live according to their own
> constitutions, which, as a result, allows them to establish their own state
> languages along with Russian, ” he said.
>
> “For today's topic, Dagestan and Crimea are the most interesting regions.
> In most republics, the second state language is one — Mari in Mari El,
> Buryat in Buryatia, Ingush in Ingushetia, Chuvash in Chuvashia, and so on,
> in Mordovia and Kabardino-Balkaria there are two official languages, in
> Karachay-Cherkessia there are four, and in Dagestan, the Constitution
> establishes that the languages of all Dagestan peoples are state. De facto,
> we are talking only about 13 languages that have written form, including
> the official language of a foreign state - Azerbaijani, ” Andrey Petrov
> said, adding that the case of the Azerbaijani language is a good example of
> the Russian language policy.
>
> "Azerbaijanis are the indigenous people of Dagestan, a third of the
> population of the well-known Derbent are Azerbaijanis. Azerbaijani was once
> the language of interethnic communication in the south of the region,
> therefore, when the Soviet Union collapsed and Azerbaijan turned out to be
> a foreign state for Russia, no discussions arose what to do with its
> language. Azerbaijani has become the Russian state language together with
> other languages of the peoples of Dagestan, because in Russia the language
> issue is resolved simply: people have the right to speak, write and read in
> their native language if they want, including in the schools, media and
> official documents. The Azerbaijani people declared independence, but the
> Dagestan Azeris did not cease to be Russians and have the same rights as
> other Russian peoples, ”the senior analyst explained.
>
> The same policy was applied to Crimea when the republic became the part of
> Russia. “The Crimean constitution proclaimed Russian, Ukrainian, and
> Crimean-Tatar state languages, and when Crimea and Sevastopol became
> subjects of the Russian Federation, all that remained. Crimean-Tatar, in
> fact, first received the status of the state language, since unitary
> Ukraine has only one official language. The status of Ukrainian as the
> state language of Russia is not disputed by anyone, despite the complexity
> of the Russian-Ukrainian relations and the fact that for more than 20 years
> Ukrainian has been a foreign language. This status will not be changed in
> the future: Ukrainians are now one of the indigenous peoples of our country
> and have the right to speak, write and read in their native language, ”
> Andrey Petrov said.
>
> He also noted that this right is enshrined in Article 26 of the 2nd chapter
> of the Russian Constitution: “Everyone has the right to use his native
> language and to a free choice of language of communication, education,
> upbringing and creativity.”
>
> 2480 views
>
>    - Crimea <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/crimea>
>    - Vesti FM <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/tags/Vesti FM>
>    - Russia and Ukraine <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/tags/Russia and
> Ukraine>
>    - Russia and Azerbaijan <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/tags/Russia and
>    Azerbaijan>
>    - Russian language <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/tags/Russian language>
>    - Andrey Petrov <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/tags/Andrey Petrov>
>    - Azerbaijani language <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/tags/Azerbaijani
>    language>
>    - National Question <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/tags/National Question>
>    - Ukrainian language <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/tags/Ukrainian
> language>
>    - Crimean-Tatar language <http://vestnikkavkaza.net/tags/Crimean-Tatar
>    language>
>    - Ещё .
>
>
>
> --
> =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+
>
>  Harold F. Schiffman
>
> Professor Emeritus of
>  Dravidian Linguistics and Culture
> Dept. of South Asia Studies
> University of Pennsylvania
> Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305
>
> Phone:  (215) 898-7475
> Fax:  (215) 573-2138
>
> Email:  haroldfs at gmail.com
> http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/~haroldfs/
>
> -------------------------------------------------
>
>
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-- 
=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+

 Harold F. Schiffman

Professor Emeritus of
 Dravidian Linguistics and Culture
Dept. of South Asia Studies
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305

Phone:  (215) 898-7475
Fax:  (215) 573-2138

Email:  haroldfs at gmail.com
http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/~haroldfs/

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