[lg policy] Iranian Official Says Iran Intends To Ban English Lessons In Primary Schools

Harold Schiffman haroldfs at gmail.com
Mon Jan 8 10:02:18 EST 2018


Iranian Official Says Iran Intends To Ban English Lessons In Primary Schools


More for to a Western “cultural invasion.”“Teaching English in government
and nongovernment primary schools in the official curriculum is against
laws and regulations,” Mehdi Navid-Adham, the head of the state-run High
Education Council, told state television late on Saturday.“This is because
the assumption is that, in primary education, the groundwork for the
Iranian culture of the students is laid,” Mr. Navid-Adham said, adding that
noncurriculum English classes might also be blocked.The teaching of English
usually starts in middle school in Iran, around the ages of 12 to 14, but
some primary schools below that age also have English classes.Some children
also attend private language institutes after their school day. And many
children from more privileged families who attend nongovernment schools
receive English tuition from day care through high school.Continue reading
the main storyRelated CoverageOutside Iran’s Most Notorious Prison, Calls
for Loved Ones to Be Freed JAN. 7, 2018Iranians, Like Their Leaders, See
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Economic Woes DEC. 29, 2017ADVERTISEMENTContinue reading the main
storyIran’s Islamic leaders have often warned about the dangers of a
“cultural invasion,” and the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, voiced
outrage in 2016 over the “teaching of the English language spreading to
nursery schools.”Newsletter Sign UpContinue reading the main storyThe
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services.See Sample Manage Email Preferences Privacy Policy Opt out or
contact us anytimeAyatollah Khamenei, who has the final say in all state
matters, said in that speech to teachers, “That does not mean opposition to
learning a foreign language, but (this is the) promotion of a foreign
culture in the country and among children, young adults and
youths.”“Western thinkers have time and again said that instead of
colonialist expansionism ... the best and the least costly way would have
been inculcation of thought and culture to the younger generation of
countries,” Ayatollah Khamenei said, according to the text of the speech
posted on Leader.ir, a website run by his office.While there was no mention
of the announcement being linked to recent protests against the clerical
establishment and government, Iran’s Revolutionary Guards have blamed
foreign enemies for fomenting the unrest.Iranian officials said at least 21
people were killed and more than 1,000 arrested during the protests that
spread to more than 80 cities and rural towns, as thousands of young and
working-class Iranians expressed their anger at graft, unemployment and a
deepening gap between rich and poor.A video of the ban announcement was
widely circulated on social media on Sunday, with Iranians calling it “the
filtering of English,” jokingly comparing it to the government’s blocking
of the popular app Telegram during the protests.A version of this article
appears in print on January 8, 2018, on Page A10 of the New York edition
with the headline: Iran Leaders Ban English Classes in Primary Schools to
Block ‘Cultural Invasion’. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|SubscribeContinue
reading the main storyFrom Our AdvertisersRelated CoverageOutside Iran’s
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2018Iranians, Like Their Leaders, See Foreign Hand in Protests JAN. 3,
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Iran Bans English in Primary Schools to Block 'Cultural Invasion' - The ...
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/07/world/middleeast/iran-english-schools.html
18 hours ago - “Teaching English in government and nongovernment primary
schools in the official curriculum is against laws and regulations,” Mehdi
Navid-Adham, the head of the state-run High Education Council, told state
television late on Saturday. “This is because the assumption is that, in
primary education, the ...

Iranian Official Says Iran Intends To Ban English Lessons In Primary ...
https://www.rferl.org/a/iran-bans-english-primary-schools/28962536.html

7 hours ago - A senior Iranian education official says Iran intends to ban
English-language classes from primary schools amid warnings from Islamic
leaders that the language has led to a "cultural invasion" from the West.
Mehdi Navid-Adham, chief of the High Education Council, told state-run TV
on January 7 that ...

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 Harold F. Schiffman

Professor Emeritus of
 Dravidian Linguistics and Culture
Dept. of South Asia Studies
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6305

Phone:  (215) 898-7475
Fax:  (215) 573-2138

Email:  haroldfs at gmail.com
http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/~haroldfs/

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