[Ads-l] growler/growlette

Benjamin Barrett gogaku at IX.NETCOM.COM
Tue Jan 6 19:43:02 UTC 2015


Thank you for the follow-up. I didn't recall mention of a growlette or 
see it in the archives just now, though your post 
(http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2013-July/127851.html) 
and others' posts on growlers stuck in my mind when I saw the kombucha 
growler fill station at Haggen's yesterday. I don't see any links in the 
ADS posts I looked at, though I might have missed it :)

Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beer_bottle#Growler) and 
Wiktionary (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/growler) agree that 64 ounces 
is the most common growler size, saying they come in smaller sizes, too, 
and Wikipedia says that the 32-ounce size may be called a howler (?< 
half growler). The article also says that growlers are for beer.

However, Google shows that beer is not the only thing that now goes into 
a growler. For example, "cider growler" has a number of hits, 
particularly WRT to Washington State, where the governor signed a bill 
to allow people to buy hard cider in growlers last year 
(http://apps.leg.wa.gov/billinfo/summary.aspx?year=2013&bill=6442).

Non-alcoholically, Googling on "kombucha growler" shows that Haggen's is 
not unique in extending the term:

"Kombucha fill stations are taking over Idaho, and we couldn't be more 
excited!" 
(http://hummkombucha.com/boiseweekly-humm-kombucha-growler-fill-station/)

Other non-alcoholic uses:
"coconut water growler" at 
http://media.wholefoodsmarket.com/news/whole-foods-market-to-open-its-doors-in-danbury-ct-may-17-2013.

"soda growler" at 
http://bierwerks.com/bierwerks-products/currently-on-tap.html
http://www.yelp.com/biz/montrose-beer-and-soda-croton-on-hudson
http://www.lafayettebrewingco.com/food.html

There are some hits for "water growler," but a casual look doesn't 
reveal anything that seems very convincing that there are "water 
growler" services.

It seems the size, material (ceramic or glass) and jar shape are the 
critical elements of a growler.

Going through the Google hit pages for "growlette," there are just 239 
hits, some with quotation marks. Also, "1-gallon growler" gets about 75 
hits and "one-gallon growler" gets 53.

Benjamin Barrett
Formerly of Seattle, WA

Learn Ainu! https://sites.google.com/site/aynuitak1/home


> victor steinbok <mailto:aardvark66 at GMAIL.COM>
> January 6, 2015 at 9:33 AM
> ---------------------- Information from the mail header 
> -----------------------
> Sender: American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
> Poster: victor steinbok <aardvark66 at GMAIL.COM>
> Subject: Re: growler/growlette
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> It's generally agreed on tge craft beer scene that "growler" is reserved
> for the 64 oz./ 1/2 gal / 2 liter glass or metal container and, in some
> states, like Florida, that allow it, 1 gal glass jugs. It has to be
> resealable, for beer purposes, thus is usually a pop-top (a.k.a. flip-top
> or swing-top) or screw-cap.
>
> It is also generally agreed that there's no unique agreed-upon name 
> for the
> small containers. Growlette is mildly popular but is often met with
> derision as "effeminate". "Half-growler" and "small growler" are more
> popular. The standard avoidance convention suggest just listing "growler"
> and specifying the capacity. I believe, I've posted links to Beer Advocate
> threads on the subject in not-too-distant past.
>
> VS-)
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>

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