[Ads-l] Arrabeller

Ben Zimmer bgzimmer at GMAIL.COM
Wed Feb 15 14:40:02 EST 2017


Here's the gravestone in question:

https://findagrave.com/cgi-bin//fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=82945472

"Arrabeller," the daughter of Henderson and Nancy Anglin, died in infancy
(b. Oct. 30, 1855, d. Dec. 28, 1856).


On Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 2:00 PM, Peter Reitan <pjreitan at hotmail.com> wrote:

> There were seven Arabellers, with that spelling, in the 1880 US census -
> three of them born in Georgia.
>
> And if Arabeller is a woman's name, couldn't she have married an Anglin?
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU> on behalf of
> George Thompson <george.thompson at NYU.EDU>
> Sent: Wednesday, February 15, 2017 9:45 AM
> To: ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
> Subject: Re: Arrabeller
>
> ---------------------- Information from the mail header
> -----------------------
> Sender:       American Dialect Society <ADS-L at LISTSERV.UGA.EDU>
> Poster:       George Thompson <george.thompson at NYU.EDU>
> Subject:      Re: Arrabeller
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> -------------------
>
> There seem to have been a hell of a lot of Anglins in Georgia back then.
> The only Arabella Anglin shows up in the 1870 & 1880 census of Big Creek,
> Forsyth, Georgia, but she was born in 1869.
>
> GAT
>
> On Tue, Feb 14, 2017 at 9:08 PM, Jonathan Lighter <wuxxmupp2000 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > The Science Channel's "What on Earth" series briefly shows a gravestone
> in
> > rural Georgia with the name "Arrabeller E. Anglin."
> >
> > Arrabeller was born in 1855, but the camera cut away without showing the
> > year of her death.
> >
> > See, the gravestone was located in the middle of an airport runway for
> many
> > years. Until one day....
> >
> > JL
> >
> >
>

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