[Ads-l] Facebookery: "Sally refuses to be _gaslit_."

Wilson Gray hwgray at GMAIL.COM
Sun Jan 15 23:39:34 EST 2017


Would you say (a) or (b):

a) I lighted a match.

b) I lit a match.

Exactly! I'd say, "I _struck_ a match."


On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 9:03 PM, Ben Zimmer <bgzimmer at gmail.com> wrote:

> I would also assume "gaslighted" is older, which is why I was surprised to
> hear "gaslit" used in the 1965 "Gomer Pyle" episode -- which, even if it's
> not the earliest known use of the verb (thanks to Stephen and Garson
> finding cites from 1961 and 1962) is still pretty early in the term's
> development.
>
>
> On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 7:22 PM, Dan Goncharoff <thegonch at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > I will only say that 'gaslighted' seems older, 'gaslit' more recent.
> >
> > OTOH, I can't imagine using 'highlit' instead of 'highlighted'.
> >
> > DanG
> >
> > On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 4:34 PM, Wilson Gray <hwgray at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 10:47 AM, Dan Goncharoff <thegonch at gmail.com>
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > > > Wouldn't the word "gaslit" be familiar
> > >
> > >
> > > To whom? How can anyone tell? I *prefer* "gaslighted," but I don't feel
> > > that "gaslit" is "wrong," in any sense. The difference is akin to that
> > > between "ee-conomic" and "eh-conomic" or "ee-ther" and "eye-ther" or
> > > "thrive, throve, thriven" and "thrive, thrived, thrived," IMO.
> > >
> > > "You pays your money, and you takes your choice."
> > >
> > > "Different strokes for different folks."
> > >
> > > Youneverknow.
> > >
> >
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org
>



-- 
-Wilson
-----
All say, "How hard it is that we have to die!"---a strange complaint to
come from the mouths of people who have had to live.
-Mark Twain

------------------------------------------------------------
The American Dialect Society - http://www.americandialect.org


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