[Lingtyp] Seats of emotions: experiencer pronouns, body-part collocations and similar

Enrique L. Palancar epalancar at hotmail.com
Sat Jun 27 14:48:43 UTC 2015


Hi Kilu, 
Following up with what Guillaume mentions about Gyalrong languages, in the Oto-Manguean languages of Mexico it is also very common to find expressions for emotions based on body parts referring to internal organs. For example, in the Otomi languages (Oto-Pamean branch of Oto-Manguean), there are some based on two elements: one means something like ‘mouth.of.stomach/heart/belly’, the other could perhaps be translatable as ‘liver/gallbladder’. The expressions vary a bit across the languages of this family, but Mezquital Otomi can illustrate a typical case:
Mezquital Otomi:
http://www-01.sil.org/mexico/otopame/mezquital/S045b-DicOtomiMezq-ote.pdf
tü [rá mui]be.adhered.to.surface SG.3POSS mouth.of.stomach‘be sad’
hüm-p-a=[rá mui]be.on.top.of.surface-3DAT-BOUND=SG.3POSS mouth.of.stomach‘be happy’
tüts-w-a=[rá mui]carry.on.onself-3DAT-BOUND=SG.3POSS mouth.of.stomach‘be interested/motivated’
yo [rá mui]?? SG.3POSS mouth.of.stomach‘be compassionate’
po [rá kwe]exit.liquid SG.3POSS liver‘be angry’
Best,Enrique
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::Enrique L. Palancar
SeDyL(UMR8202), CNRS7 rue Guy Môquet, 94801 Villejuif (Paris), France<cnrs.academia.edu/EnriquePalancar>
Date: Sat, 27 Jun 2015 11:16:05 +0200
From: rgyalrongskad at gmail.com
To: watasenia at gmail.com
CC: LINGTYP at listserv.linguistlist.org
Subject: Re: [Lingtyp] Seats of emotions: experiencer pronouns, body-part collocations and similar

Dear Kilu,
In Gyalrong languages like Japhug, such constructions are common, and occur with a restricted set of inalienably possessed nouns including body parts like -sni 'heart' and abstract nouns like  -sɯm 'thought', -ʑɯβ 'sleep (n)'. Sometimes, we have noun-verbs collocations that do not exist separate from each other (as in (3), Jacques (2012:1213)). 
(1) ɯ-sni ɲɯ-zdɯɣ3sg.poss-thought SENS-painful`He feels sad.'
(2) a-ʑɯβ ɲɯ-ɣi1sg.poss-sleep SENS-come'I feel sleepy'
(3) ɯ-ʑi ɲɯ-loʁ3sg.poss-nausea SENS-have.nausea
'he has nausea' (the noun -ʑi and the verb loʁ cannot be used on their own)
Many of these noun-verbs collocation (but not all) have corresponding incorporating verbs (in which case the experiencer cannot be expressed as a possessive prefix anymore), for instance from (3) one can derive the incorporating verbs sɤ-ʑɯ-loʁ 'be disgusting' and nɤ-ʑɯ-loʁ 'have nausea, be disgusted of'.
Ref: Jacques, G. 2012. From denominal derivation to incorporation. Lingua 122.11:1207-1231
https://www.academia.edu/1627216/From_denominal_derivation_to_Incorporation



Guillaume
2015-06-27 10:39 GMT+02:00 Kilu von Prince <watasenia at gmail.com>:
Dear colleagues,
I'm working on an article on expressions of emotions that require an idiosyncratic combination of a subject (typically a body-part) and predicate (typically with a more general meaning such as `be good', `be sweet', `hurt' or similar), as exemplified by the following structure from Oceanic Daakaka:
(1) yu-on mwe yaainside.of-3S.POSS REAL hurt`he/she is angry'
I am aware of a few other, typologically diverse languages that show such structures: Acholi (Bavin 1996), Hmong (Clark 1996) and Anywa (Reh 1996), which is described to have `experiencer pronouns'. 
I would like to know:1) if you know of other languages with such structures; and2) how are the corresponding nominal notions expressed in these languages (anger, happiness, sadness, love)?
Of course, I'll be happy to cite your published work or cite your personal communication as a source, unless you specify otherwise.
Regards,Kilu
References:Bavin, Edith L. 1996. Body parts in Acholi: alienable and inalienable distinctions and extended uses. In: Chappell, Hilary, & McGregor, William (eds), e grammar of inalienability: A typological perspective on body part terms and the part-whole relation. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter Mouton.
Clark, Marybeth. 1996. Where do you feel? – stative verbs and body-part terms in Mainland Southeast Asia. In: Chappell, Hilary, & McGregor, William (eds), e grammar of inalienability: A typological perspective on body part terms and the part-whole relation. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter Mouton. 
Reh, Mechthild. 1996. Anywa language. Description and internal reconstructions. (Nilo-Saharan, 11.). Köln: Rüdiger Köppe.


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-- 
Guillaume Jacques
CNRS (CRLAO) - INALCO
http://cnrs.academia.edu/GuillaumeJacques
http://himalco.hypotheses.org/http://panchr.hypotheses.org/


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