18.74, Calls: General Linguistics/Italy; Text/Corpus Linguistics/UK

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LINGUIST List: Vol-18-74. Thu Jan 11 2007. ISSN: 1068 - 4875.

Subject: 18.74, Calls: General Linguistics/Italy; Text/Corpus Linguistics/UK

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1)
Date: 09-Jan-2007
From: Elena Tognini Bonelli < elena at twc.it >
Subject: Keyness in Text 

2)
Date: 05-Jan-2007
From: Paul Rayson < paul at comp.lancs.ac.uk >
Subject: Corpus Linguistics 2007 

	
-------------------------Message 1 ---------------------------------- 
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2007 11:03:13
From: Elena Tognini Bonelli < elena at twc.it >
Subject: Keyness in Text 
 


Full Title: Keyness in Text 

Date: 26-Jun-2007 - 30-Jun-2007
Location: Certosa di Pontignano, Siena, Italy 
Contact Person: Elena Tognini Bonelli
Meeting Email: elena at twc.it, togninibonel at unisi.it
Web Site: http://www.disas.unisi.it/keyness/index.php 

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics 

Call Deadline: 01-Mar-2007 

Meeting Description:

The conference will focus on the techniques, methods and criteria that are used to determine keyness and also with the results of the exercise of keyness skills.  The concept of "keyness" will be addressed in relation to:
-	Specialized discourse 
-	Text and genre analysis 
-	Multilingualism and contrastive approaches   
-	Translation
-	The cultural dimension
-	The cognitive dimension  
-	Text-mining and data-mining
-	Diachronic perspectives
-	Spoken/written language
-	Pedagogical aspects in EFL, EAP and LSP
-	Lexis and Lexicography 
-	Terminology and Terminography 

Some things are more important than others, and one of the most valuable skills is the ability to evaluate experience along this dimension.  For this conference, the dimension we want to focus on is Keyness in Text applied to documents and speech events.  

We are equally concerned with the techniques, methods and criteria that are used to determine keyness as with the results of the exercise of keyness skills.  

There are many different approaches to the concept of keyness.  The conference will focus on three main ones. One is an approach from a background of cultural studies and the history of ideas, where the notions that shape the society are studied, such as in Raymond Williams' seminal work 1976.  Another approach is from lexical and lexicographical studies, both contemporary and historical, where the task of definition requires the perception and the selection of key concepts.  Another is from the computational examination of texts, in the style of text-mining, the identification of certain words based on their frequency distribution and clustering in a document. 

On the more practical level, there is a widely established convention on the internet and in academic publication of requiring the originator of a document to provide ''keywords'', which are then used in classification and search strategies. Quite often, however, the identification of aboutness in a given text requires a phraseological perspective. 

Keyness is an essential component in almost all forms of education; the ability to digest substantial amounts of input material and pick out the important issues is specifically taught in language classes under headings like ''summarisation'', in all kinds of subjects. Contributions to the conference are encouraged that consider all kinds of treatment of the concept of keyness in theory and applications with particular emphasis to language teaching for Special Purposes. 
Particular attention will also be devoted to the automatic identification of keyness. Software demonstrations are encouraged.

The conference welcomes submissions on any of these approaches to keyness, in particular the following themes will be considered:

The concept of ''keyness'' in relation to:

-	Specialized discourse 
-	Text and genre analysis 
-	Multilingualism and contrastive approaches   
-	Translation
-	The cultural dimension
-	The cognitive dimension  
-	Text-mining and data-mining
-	Diachronic perspectives
-	Spoken/written language
-	Pedagogical aspects in EFL, EAP and LSP
-	Lexis and Lexicography 
-	Terminology and Terminography

Keynote Speakers

- Omar Calabrese, University of Siena
- François Rastier, CNRS, Paris 
- Mike Scott, University of Liverpool 
- Mike Stubbs, University of Trier 
- Martin Warren, Hong Kong Polytechnic 

Organising Committee

- Elena Tognini Bonelli, Università di Siena
- Anna Lazzari, Università di Siena 

Scientific Committee

- Marina Bondi, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Chair)
- Laurie Anderson, University of Siena
- Julia Bamford, University of Roma La Sapienza
- Gabriella Del Lungo, Università di Firenze
- Marina Dossena, Università di Bergamo
- John Morley, University of Siena
- Rita Salvi, University of Roma La Sapienza
- Marc Silver, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
- John Sinclair, The Tuscan Word Centre
- Wolfgang Teubert, University of Birmingham 
- Elena Tognini Bonelli, Università di Siena
- Martin Warren
- Geoffrey Williams


	
-------------------------Message 2 ---------------------------------- 
Date: Thu, 11 Jan 2007 11:03:19
From: Paul Rayson < paul at comp.lancs.ac.uk >
Subject: Corpus Linguistics 2007 

	

Full Title: Corpus Linguistics 2007 

Date: 27-Jul-2007 - 30-Jul-2007
Location: Birmingham, United Kingdom 
Contact Person: Susan Hunston
Meeting Email: CL2007 at contacts.bham.ac.uk
Web Site: http://www.corpus.bham.ac.uk/conference2007/index.htm 

Linguistic Field(s): Text/Corpus Linguistics 

Call Deadline: 20-Jan-2007 

Meeting Description:

Corpus Linguistics 2007, University of Birmingham, UK 

Corpus Linguistics 2007

July 27-30 2007

University of Birmingham, UK

Third and Final Call for Papers

This is the final call for papers for the Corpus Linguistics 2007 conference to be held at the University of Birmingham, 27-30 July 2007. The closing date for submission of abstracts is 20th January 2007.

Latest News: Publications of Conference Papers

By popular demand, papers from Corpus Linguistics 2007 will be published on the web by September 2007. Conditions: final versions of papers, correctly formatted, must be submitted by 1st July 2007; author(s) must have registered for the conference by the same date. 

Abstracts are invited for presentations at the conference. Four categories of abstracts are invited:

Papers. Individual papers will be allocated 20 minutes. Paper Abstracts should be no more than 300 words.

Posters. Poster Abstracts should be no more than 200 words.

Colloquia. These usually take the form of between 4 and 8 papers, with time for audience discussion. We will accommodate short colloquia (2 hours, about 4 speakers) and longer colloquia (4 hours, about 8 speakers). Colloquium Abstracts should be no more than 1000 words (for colloquia of 2 hours) or 2000 words (for colloquia of 4 hours). The abstract should include a rationale for the colloquium, an indication of how much of the time will be allocated to audience discussion, and an abstract for each of the proposed papers. 

Workshops. These usually include one or two short presentations and substantial audience participation. We will accommodate short workshops (1 hour) and longer workshops (2 hours). Workshop Abstracts should be no more than 300 words (for a workshop of 1 hour) or 600 words (for a workshop of 2 hours) and should describe the organisation of the workshop and the nature of the audience participation.

All abstracts should be in English, though we encourage proposals for colloquia to be given in languages other than English.

Closing date for abstracts: 20th January 2007.

To submit an abstract, go to the following URL and follow the instructions.

https://www.softconf.com/starts/CL07/submit.html 

Conference website: www.corpus.bham.ac.uk/conference2007

Contact email address: CL2007 at contacts.bham.ac.uk
 



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