The magic of ignorance - English a false prophet (Correction)

Anonby stan-sandy_anonby at sil.org
Tue Jan 11 12:22:11 UTC 2005


MessageI don't think it's that easy to differentiate between the whole and the parts. I think Hamo was trying to say that in order for a nation to advance economically, you only have to have a few parts of the population speaking English. But nobody wants to be relegated to the non English speaking majority. Everyone wants to belong to that elite group that speaks English. Do you think it's possible to convince people of this "erroneous premise"?

Stan Anonby 
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Anthea Fraser Gupta 
  To: lgpolicy-list at ccat.sas.upenn.edu 
  Sent: Monday, January 10, 2005 3:19 PM
  Subject: RE: The magic of ignorance - English a false prophet (Correction)


  Hamo said:

  'The sentence, "This entire notion is built on the erroneous premise that what is good for the whole is good for all of the parts", should have read "This entire notion is built on the erroneous premise that what is good for the whole is good for each of its parts". '

  Why?  Both of these sentences (all/each of) are acceptable and idiomatic in current writing pratice. 

  Anthea

  *     *     *     *     *
  Anthea Fraser Gupta (Dr)
  School of English, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT <www.leeds.ac.uk/english/staff/afg>
  NB: Reply to a.f.gupta at leeds.ac.uk
  *     *     *     *     *
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