[Ethnocomm] cultural foundations of communication research

David Boromisza-Habashi dbh at Colorado.EDU
Sun Jul 22 17:55:35 EDT 2018


Dear Ethnocommers,

Thanks to everyone who has generously responded to my query! I thought I would compile your recommendations and share it with everyone.

1. Work that directly addresses the cultural foundations of the communication discipline / expert systems of communication

Cameron, D. (2000). Good to talk? Living and working in a communication culture. London, U.K.: Sage.

Katz, E., & Fialkoff, Y. (forthcoming). Communication. Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology.

Peters, J. D. (1999). Speaking into the air: A history of the idea of communication. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Philipsen, G. (2015). Paying lip service to "speech" in disciplinary naming, 1914-1954. In P. J. Gehrke, & W. M. Keith (Eds.), A century of communication studies: The unfinished conversation (pp. 46-63). New York, NY: Routledge.


2. "Deeper dives" into the (cultural / Western) meanings of communication and their dissemination around the world

Boromisza-Habashi, D. (2016). What we need is good communication: Vernacular globalization in some Hungarian speech. International Journal of Communication, 10, 4600-4619. Retrieved from http://ijoc.org/index.php/ijoc/article/view/4110/1788

Carbaugh, D. (1988). Talking American: Cultural discourses on Donahue. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Castor, T., & Bartesaghi, M. (2016). Metacommunication during disaster response: "Reporting" and the constitution of problems in hurricane Katrina teleconferences. Management Communication Quarterly, 30(4), 472-502.

Chang, B. G. (1996). Deconstructing communication: Representation, subject, and economies of exchange. University of Minnesota Press.

Illouz, E. (2003). Oprah Winfrey and the glamour of misery: An essay on popular culture. Columbia UP.

John, N. (2017). The age of sharing. Cambridge, UK: Polity.

Katriel, T., & Philipsen, G. (1981). "What we need is communication": "Communication" as a cultural category in some American speech. Communication Monographs, 48(4), 301-317.


Cheers, David

---
David Boromisza-Habashi, Ph.D. (he/him/his)
Associate Professor
Department of Communication
University of Colorado Boulder
CMCI<http://www.colorado.edu/cmci/people/communication/david-boromisza-habashi> | Academia.edu<https://colorado.academia.edu/DavidBoromiszaHabashi> | Twitter<https://twitter.com/dr_dbh>

From: David Boromisza-Habashi
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 12:18 PM
To: ETHNOCOMM at listserv.linguistlist.org
Subject: cultural foundations of communication research

Hi All,

An org comm colleague of mine is investigating the US American cultural foundations of communication research, and asked me for relevant references. So far, I am planning to share with her Gerry's (2015) "Paying lip service to "speech" in disciplinary naming, 1914-1954," Peters's Speaking into the Air, and Cameron's Good to Talk, all of which draw on EC scholarship to say important things about the role of US American conceptions of communication in the formation of Communication as a discipline and as an expert system.

I would be grateful if you could share with me any additional references that come to mind!

Cheers, David

---
David Boromisza-Habashi, Ph.D. (he/him/his)
Associate Professor
Department of Communication
University of Colorado Boulder
CMCI<http://www.colorado.edu/cmci/people/communication/david-boromisza-habashi> | Academia.edu<https://colorado.academia.edu/DavidBoromiszaHabashi> | Twitter<https://twitter.com/dr_dbh>

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