[Lingtyp] Query: syllable-reversing ludlings

Hiroto Uchihara uchihara at buffalo.edu
Sun May 17 12:35:32 EDT 2020


Dear David,

Japanese Zuu-jaa go does this, although I don't use this ludling so I don't
have an intuition (I believe it became obsolete in the 90's). It looks like
tri-moraic words follow the pattern 123 > 231 (Ito, Kitagawa & Mester
1996), such as pi.a.no 'piano' > ya.no.pi, shi.ka.ke 'trick' > ka.ke.shi,
ma.zú.i 'tastes bad' > zu.i.ma, ku.su.ri 'drug' > su.ri.ku. It appears that
the location of the pitch accent doesn't matter: 'tastes bad' have accent
on the penultimate mora while others are unaccented.

I hope this helps.

Reference:
Ito, Junko, Yoshihisa Kitagawa & Armin Mester. 1996. Prosodic faithfulness
and correspondence: evidence from Japanese argot. Journal of East Asian
Linguistics 5.3: 217-294.

Hiroto

El dom., 17 de may. de 2020 a la(s) 11:03, David Gil (gil at shh.mpg.de)
escribió:

> Dear all,
>
>
>
> Ludlings (aka play languages or secret languages) are often constructed by
> reversing the order of syllables in a word.  Using numerals to denote
> syllables, 12 > 21.  But what happens when there are three (or more)
> syllables in the word?  For tri-syllabic words, the two most common
> outcomes are
>
>
>
> (a) 123 > 312
>
> (b) 123 > 231
>
>
>
> The Riau Indonesian ludling I have written about has the (a) pattern, eg. *bahasa
> > sabaha*. But a friend of mine in Papua has recently started writing to
> me in a ludling using the (b) pattern, e.g. *bahasa > hasaba*.  Which got
> me curious.  According to Wikipedia, the French ludling *verlan* may use
> either option, e.g. *cigarette* > *restiga* or *garetsi*.
>
>
>
> I would appreciate any information you might be able to provide with
> regard to syllable-reversing ludlings of this kind that you might be
> familiar with in other languages.  Specifically, I would like to know:
>
>
>
> (1) which pattern is followed in tri-syllabic words: (a), (b), or perhaps
> other?
>
> (2) what is the location of word-stress in the language?
>
>
>
> The motivation behind the second question is that I have a hunch that the
> difference between the ludlings in closely related Riau Indonesian and
> Papuan Malay might be due to their different stress patterns — a hypothesis
> that is easily tested by looking at a handful of other languages.
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
>
> David
>
> --
> David Gil
>
> Senior Scientist (Associate)
> Department of Linguistic and Cultural Evolution
> Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
> Kahlaische Strasse 10, 07745 Jena, Germany
>
> Email: gil at shh.mpg.de
> Mobile Phone (Israel): +972-556825895
> Mobile Phone (Indonesia): +62-81344082091
>
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>


-- 
Dr. Hiroto Uchihara
https://sites.google.com/view/hiroto-uchihara/home?authuser=0
Seminario de Lenguas Indígenas
Instituto de Investigaciones Filológicas
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Circuito Mario de la Cueva
Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, Ciudad de México.
Tel. Seminario:(+52)-(55)-5622-7489
Office: (+52)-(55)-5622-7250, Ext. 49223
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